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Trying to store some data using dynamic memory allocation in two different ways, I notice a huge difference in RAM requirements which I cannot explain. Some insight would be appreciated.

In the following examples, the goal is to create a database that stores the IDs of the edges connected to a node, in a polygon mesh. However, the nature of the problem is irrelevant.

Case 1, using "plain" arrays:

program memorytest

implicit none

integer, dimension(:, :), allocatable :: node_edges
integer :: i

allocate(node_edges(10, 10000000)) ! 10000000 nodes with 10 edges each
node_edges(:, :) = 0

read *, i ! pause

deallocate(node_edges)

end program memorytest

RAM needed: ~395,500 K

Case 2, using a node type:

program memorytest

implicit none

type node
  integer, dimension(:), allocatable :: edges  
end type

type(node), dimension(:), allocatable :: nodes
integer :: i

allocate(nodes(10000000)) ! 10000000 nodes
do i = 1, 10000000
    allocate(nodes(i)%edges(10)) ! with 10 edges each
end do

do i = 1, 10000000
    nodes(i)%edges(:) = 0
end do

read *, i ! pause    

do i = 1, 10000000
    deallocate(nodes(i)%edges)
end do
deallocate(nodes)

end program memorytest

RAM needed: ~1,060,500 K

For a comparison, I tried equivalent approaches in C++.

Case 1, using "plain" arrays:

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <iostream>

int main()
{
  int** node_edges;
  int i, j;

  node_edges = new int*[10000000]; // 10000000 nodes
  for(i = 0; i < 10000000; i++) node_edges[i] = new int[10]; // with 10 edges each

  for(i = 0; i < 10000000; i++)
    for(j = 0; j < 10; j++) node_edges[i][j] = 0;

  std::cin >> i; // pause

  for(i = 0; i < 10000000; i++) delete [] node_edges[i];
  delete [] node_edges;

    return 0;
}

RAM needed: ~510,000 K

Case 2, using a node class:

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <iostream>

class node
{
  public:
    int* edges;
};

int main()
{
  node* nodes;
  int i, j;

  nodes = new node[10000000]; // 10000000 nodes
  for(i = 0; i < 10000000; i++) nodes[i].edges = new int[10]; // with 10 edges each

  for(i = 0; i < 10000000; i++)
    for(j = 0; j < 10; j++) nodes[i].edges[j] = 0;

  std::cin >> i; // pause

  for(i = 0; i < 10000000; i++) delete [] nodes[i].edges;
  delete [] nodes;

    return 0;
}

RAM needed: ~510,000 K

Development environment used: Intel Visual Fortran Studio XE 2013 and MS Visual C++ 2010 respectively, both producing 32bit executables in the default "Release" mode.

As noticed, C++ uses exactly the same amount of RAM for both approaches. In Fortran, I would have justified some minor difference but that much I cannot explain. To me, this looks like something either to do with Fortran itself, or some Intel fortran compiler flag that I am unaware of.

Any ideas why this happens and / or any suggestions to avoid this excessive RAM requirement in an object oriented approach in Fortran?

Thank you in advance.

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1  
If you used really modern C++ and not just C with a class which is just like a struct, you would see the same difference with std::vectors or other beasts. –  Vladimir F Nov 26 '13 at 19:29
    
Yes, you are right, but this would also consider std::vector::capacity or some other modern-language-related overhead. I tried to create a fair-comparison situation between the two languages and adapt the C++ approach to Fortran style, to see if I get the same behavior. Btw, C++ needs significantly more RAM than Fortran's "plain arrays" version in the above example but that wasn't what I had no explanation for. :) –  georg.balafas Nov 26 '13 at 21:35
    
The point is Fortran arrays are closer to C++ vectors than to the C arrays which are only adresses. They are order of magnitude more powerful. –  Vladimir F Nov 26 '13 at 22:47

1 Answer 1

up vote 9 down vote accepted

One thing to bear in mind is that allocating a two dimensional array and single dimensional arrays are different. For example:

  allocate(node_edges(10, 100)) 

Allocates a single block of memory which can contain a 1000 items.

  allocate(nodes(100)) ! 10000000 nodes
  do i = 1, 100
      allocate(nodes(i)%edges(10)) ! with 10 edges each
  end do

Allocates a single block that can contains 100 items and each of which has 10 sub-items. Same number of items so same memory usage?

No. In the second case you have allocated 100 new arrays. Each one has overhead. In Fortran this can be quite high because it has to keep track of the array dimensions - you may want to take an array section later. This is especially noticeable when the allocation size is small. In this case it is 10 and with the extra array information plus padding it could have doubled the allocated size -- which it has in your case.

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4  
The Intel Fortran documentation reveals that array descriptors are, on 64-bit machines, 48 bytes plus 8 bytes for each dimension. software.intel.com/sites/products/documentation/hpc/composerxe/… –  High Performance Mark Nov 26 '13 at 16:16
1  
I found an old discussion. Using gfortran test.f90 -fdump-tree-original, you can see what is done exactly, including all the overhead (type and offset plus lbound, ubound and stride for every dimension). –  Stefan Nov 26 '13 at 16:22
2  
Comment 1: using gfortran (in linux) needs 381.6 MiB and 918.7 MiB respectively, for cases 1 and 2. So it is not a compiler specific issue. Comment 2: reversing the sizes in case 2, ie 10 nodes with 10000000 edges each (10 huge arrays vs 10000000 small arrays we had previously), needs also 381.6 MiB. This indicates that it is this extra information that causes the overhead. Now, I don't know if there is a workaround to this. Thank you all. (Sorry, not enough reputation to vote up yet) –  georg.balafas Nov 26 '13 at 18:14
1  
Gfortan and Intel are different, but will not be in the future. ISO/IEC TS 29113:2012 defines a common format for the array descriptor (which Intel already uses) and which Gfortran is also going to adopt. –  Vladimir F Nov 26 '13 at 19:26
2  
@georg.balafas you do not have to upvote answers to your questions. Accepting them is the primary thing. –  Vladimir F Nov 26 '13 at 19:30

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