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I have a class which implements IDisposable like such

  public class SomeClass : IDisposable
{
    private IList<string> _someList = new List<string>();

    public IList<string> SomeList
    {
        get { return _someList; }
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        _someList = null;
    }
}

and a method that uses 'using' blocks to create two instances of this class and add it to a collection like such

private static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        IList<SomeClass> classes = new List<SomeClass>();

        using (var sc = new SomeClass())
        {
            sc.SomeList.Add("a");
            classes.Add(sc);
        }

        using (var sc = new SomeClass())
        {
            sc.SomeList.Add("b");
            classes.Add(sc);
        }

        foreach (var a in classes)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(a.SomeList[0]);
        }

        Console.ReadLine();
    }

Whats happening here is by the time i come to the foreach to iterate through my elements in "classes" the "SomeList" property of both my objects are null.

I do understand that since each using executes Dispose() and in the dispose, i AM null-ing the two lists, they will be null.

My question is how do i achieve this without having to stop null-ing "SomeList" inside my dispose().

thanks

--UPDATE 1

Something closer to real code

base.OnPreRender(e);

    Page page = HttpContext.Current.CurrentHandler as Page;
    HtmlHead head = (HtmlHead)page.Header;

    if (Settings.AreSet)
    {
        using (var noIndex = new HtmlMeta())
        {
            noIndex.Name = "somename";
            noIndex.Content = "somecontent";

            head.Controls.AddAt(0, noIndex);
        }
    }

    using (var machineName = new HtmlMeta())
    {
        machineName.Name = "somename2";
        machineName.Content = "somecontent2";

        head.Controls.AddAt(1, machineName);
    }

    UpdateHeader(head);

--UPDATE #2 A variant of the above class with a string property now, as opposed to a a list.

public class SomeClass2 : IDisposable
{
    public string SomeString { get; set; }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        SomeString = string.Empty;
    }
}

It still does the same thing for the following method. My 'classes' contains lists of 'SomeClass2' which has 'SomeString' as empty (what i set in my dispose())

IList<SomeClass2> classes = new List<SomeClass2>();

        using (var sc = new SomeClass2())
        {
            sc.SomeString = "a";
            classes.Add(sc);
        }

        using (var sc = new SomeClass2())
        {
            sc.SomeString = "a";
            classes.Add(sc);
        }

        foreach (var a in classes)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(a.SomeString);
        }


        Console.ReadLine();
share|improve this question
2  
My question is, why would you want to null the list in Dispose? That's not what Dispose is meant for. –  Kendall Frey Nov 26 '13 at 17:13

1 Answer 1

You don't want Dispose to be called? Just don't use using statement.

Or move the entire logic inside using:

private static void Main(string[] args)
{
    IList<SomeClass> classes = new List<SomeClass>();

    using (var sc = new SomeClass())
    {
        sc.SomeList.Add("a");
        classes.Add(sc);

        using (var sc = new SomeClass())
         {
            sc.SomeList.Add("b");
            classes.Add(sc);

            foreach (var a in classes)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(a.SomeList[0]);
            }
        }
    }
    Console.ReadLine();
}

Btw: looks like using IDisposable in that case is pointless. GC would gather unused List<T> objects anyway.

share|improve this answer
    
:) i know it is pointless in this example. but this example is a simplification of a code block that we have in production. It is not possible to 1. return from inside 'using' 2. we need a populated list AFTER the 'using' block (and the Dispose() method will do somthing similar, like null-ing a list) –  nesh_s Nov 26 '13 at 17:21
1  
@nesh_s Could you provide something closer to the real code? The code you have now just doesn't make sense. –  Kendall Frey Nov 26 '13 at 17:22
    
@KendallFrey My updates above. Also if i may ask WHY does the first sample doesnt make sense? I am trying to find a way to dispose a list inside a class while retaining a copy of it in my collection. –  nesh_s Nov 26 '13 at 17:33
    
You can't dispose a list, and keeping a copy of it won't cause any problems. –  Kendall Frey Nov 26 '13 at 17:36
2  
You should Dispose object only when you don't need it anymore. And in all your examples you really need the object later, so you can't dispose it. So you have to either expand using scope or get rid of it. –  MarcinJuraszek Nov 26 '13 at 17:50

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