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Hi I'm trying to do a simple chain animation in jQuery, with a pause (setTimeout) between each frame.

Say each div animates in with a duration of 3500. I would like to control the duration between each opacity fade in animation. Say between the first div and 2nd div the duration is 5 secs, and maybe 10 secs between the 2nd and 3rd frame.

How would you go about this?

http://codepen.io/leongaban/pen/Feroh

Current code

$('#blue').animate({
            opacity: '1'
      }, 3500, function(){

        // Need 5 sec pause here            

        $('#blue').fadeOut('fast');
        $('#orange').animate({
            opacity: '1'
            }, 3500, function(){

              // Need a 10 sec pause here

              $('#orange').fadeOut('fast');
              $('#green').animate({
              opacity: '1' }, 3500);

            });
      });
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Hey @PSL thanks! That first one seems like what I need that 2nd one and the one that kayen did animate too fast and don't seem to follow the duration correctly? –  Leon Gaban Nov 26 '13 at 17:23

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

That's what delay() and queue() is for:

$('#blue').animate({opacity: '1'}, 3500).delay(5000).queue(function() {
    $(this).fadeOut('fast');
    $('#orange').animate({opacity: '1'}, 3500).delay(10000).queue(function() {
        $(this).fadeOut('fast');
        $('#green').animate({opacity: '1'}, 3500);
    });
});

FIDDLE

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Thanks that is exactly what I needed to know :) –  Leon Gaban Nov 26 '13 at 17:27
    
@LeonGaban - No problem, you're welcome! –  adeneo Nov 26 '13 at 17:29

This is exactly what .delay() is for (http://api.jquery.com/delay/). It allows you to write elegant chains of animations for individual elements like this:

$( "#foo" ).slideUp( 300 ).delay( 800 ).fadeIn( 400 );

Note that you will still need to use callbacks to start animations for other objects, though.

In your case, this should be it (untested):

$('#blue')
    .animate({ opacity: '1' }, 3500)
    .delay(5000)
    .fadeOut('fast',
             function() {
                 $('#orange')
                     .animate({ opacity: '1' }, 3500)
                     .delay()
                     .fadeOut('fast',
                              function() {
                                  $('#green')
                                      .animate({ opacity: '1' }, 3500);
                              });
             });
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Thanks for the explanation! +1 –  Leon Gaban Nov 26 '13 at 17:29

You can use jQuery fadeOut/fadeIn methods with callbacks.

See here for more information.

But essentially is;

$(".myClass").fadeOut(1000, function() {
    //fadeOut complete
});

The first argument is length of time (in ms) until it completely fades out. After that duration has passed the callback fires. So you can safely assume that when the callback fires that your required waiting time has completed.

It's the same syntax for fadeIn also, but I suggest reading the link I provided. It'll explain it it greater detail.

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