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Is it possible to add a second condition to the alternative for loop representation of Java.

I have a collection that is updated at the end of a do-while loop. In this do-while loop, there is a for loop.

E.g.: (This doesn't work but illustrates what I'm trying to achieve)

List<String> list =....load up with stuff

do {
    for (String string : list && counter < 5) 
    {
       System.out.println(string);
       counter++;
    }
while(update list)

Somehow the normal representation:

do {
    for (int i = 0; i < list.size() && counter < 5; i++)
    {
       System.out.println(list.get(i));
       counter++;
    }
while(update list)

Doesn't work in this construction.

Update

I tried both answers with this piece of code:

      int counter = 0;

      List<String> list = new ArrayList<String>();
      list.add("a");
      list.add("b");
      list.add("c");
      list.add("d");
      list.add("e");

      System.out.println("Test one");

      for (String string : list) {
            if(counter < 3 )
                 System.out.println(string);
            else
                 break;
            counter++;
      }

      System.out.println("Test two");

      counter = 0;

      for (String string : list) {
          if (counter >= 3) break;
           System.out.println(string);
           counter++;
      }

TedHopp's answer solved breaking out of the first loop.

Final Solution

Breaking out of the for loop and out of the while loop, I ended up doing the following:

int breakNow = false;

do {
    for (String string : list) 
    {
       System.out.println(string);
       counter++;

       if (counter >= 3) 
       { 
           breakNow = true;
           break;
       }
    }
while(update list && !breakNow)
share|improve this question
    
The collection that is updated.. Is it the list you are iterating through ? –  Adarsh Nov 26 '13 at 18:03
    
@Adarsh Yes it is. –  Jean-Paul Nov 26 '13 at 18:03
1  
I don't think you are allowed to modify a list when iterating over it. It results in the ConcurrentModificationException –  Adarsh Nov 26 '13 at 18:05
    
@Adarsh: You are right, my construction is a bit different. Let me update my question. –  Jean-Paul Nov 26 '13 at 18:10
add comment

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You cannot incorporate a binary test with the enhanced for loop; it's not allowed by the syntax. You'll need to use the traditional for loop syntax, or else put the boolean test inside the loop and break out of it.

for (String string : list) {
   if (counter >= 5) break;
   System.out.println(string);
   counter++;
}

I'm not sure what wouldn't work with the traditional syntax that would work for the enhanced for loop; they essentially do the same thing. (In fact, since the enhanced for loop uses an iterator, you risk a concurrent modification exception if you are updating the list asynchronously.)

share|improve this answer
    
This solved it. Thanks. I already tried it with a break statement but I had my condition wrong. This clearifies it. –  Jean-Paul Nov 26 '13 at 18:17
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Not by default, but you could create something cool like this:

public class ForEachCondition
{

    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        List<Integer> ints = new ArrayList<Integer>();
        ints.add(1);
        ints.add(3);
        ints.add(100);
        ints.add(200);

        for (Integer i : new ConditionalIterator<Integer>(ints, new ConditionalIterator.Condition<Integer>()
        {
            @Override
            public boolean next(Integer t)
            {
                return t < 130;
            }
        }))
        {
            System.out.println(i);
        }
    }
}

class ConditionalIterator<T> implements Iterable<T>, Iterator<T>
{

    private Condition<T> condition;
    private Iterator<T> iterator;
    private T next;

    public ConditionalIterator(Iterable<T> it, Condition<T> cond)
    {
        this.iterator = it.iterator();
        this.condition = cond;
    }

    @Override
    public Iterator<T> iterator()
    {
        return this;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean hasNext()
    {
        if (iterator.hasNext())
        {
            next = iterator.next();
            return condition.next(next);
        }
        return false;
    }

    @Override
    public T next()
    {
        return next;
    }

    @Override
    public void remove()
    {
        iterator.remove();
    }

    public static interface Condition<T>
    {
        public boolean next(T t);
    }
}

With the new Java 8, the for could look like this:

for (Integer i : new ConditionalIterator<Integer>(ints, (Integer t) -> t < 130)
{
    System.out.println(i);
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is awesome and very creative! Thank you! –  Jean-Paul Nov 26 '13 at 18:20
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