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We have this one table that is really funky and I'm trying to get a descriptive result set out of it.
This table stores a tightly-related yet disparate collection of data types, and the meaningful column "names" are stored in a separate table. I think it'll be easier to show than to explain.

A Simplified and Abstract Example:

 CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `something_obscure` (
      `id` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
      `obscure_type_id` tinyint(2) NOT NULL,
      `segment1` varchar(92) DEFAULT NULL,
      `segment2` varchar(92) DEFAULT NULL,
      `segment3` varchar(92) DEFAULT NULL,
      `datetime_created` datetime DEFAULT NULL,
      PRIMARY KEY (`id`)
    );
    INSERT INTO `something_obscure` 
      (`id`, `obscure_type_id`, `segment1`, `segment2`, `segment3`, `datetime_created`) 
    VALUES
      ('250', 1, '123', '456', '789', '2013-05-14 10:13:44'),
      ('251', 2, 'abc', 'def', 'ghk', NULL),
      ('252', 2, NULL, NULL, 'mnop', NULL);


 CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `obscure_type` (
      `id` tinyint(2) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
      `type` varchar(30) NOT NULL,
      `description` varchar(92) DEFAULT NULL,
      `segment1` varchar(92) DEFAULT NULL COMMENT 'a LABEL/NAME for the data found in Segment1 of the Obscure table',
      `segment2` varchar(92) DEFAULT NULL,
      `segment3` varchar(92) DEFAULT NULL,
      `datetime_created` datetime DEFAULT NULL,
      PRIMARY KEY (`id`)
    );
    INSERT INTO `obscure_type` 
      (`id`, `type`, `description`, `segment1`, `segment2`, `segment3`) 
    VALUES
      (1, 'native', 'a descriptive description', 'best', 'worst', 'other'),
      (2, 'alien', 'another descriptive desc', 'in', 'out', 'stationary');


Initially, I was expecting to have put meaningful names to the columns in the business logic (in php), but if I could just get SQL to handle that before our program even sees this result set, that'd be awesome!

GOAL:
Just to illustrate (I know this won't actually work), I was thinking something kinda like:

SELECT 
  data.segment1 AS type.segment1,
  data.segment2 AS type.segment2,
  data.segment3 AS type.segment3
FROM something_obscure AS data
JOIN pobscure_type AS type
ON data.obscure_type_id = type.id
WHERE data.obscure_type_id = 2

And that would return:

----------------------------
| in   | out  | stationary |
----------------------------
| abc  | def  | ghk        |
| NULL | NULL | mnop       |
----------------------------

SUMMARY:
How would one go about setting aliases to the values of another table?
We do not want to specify the alias name, we want the alias name set by the value of the referenced field. Is that possible?

share|improve this question
    
If querying for obscure_type_id=1 the alias for segment1 would be "best", and if querying for obscure_type_id=2, then the alias would be "in" ... seems like it would implode, though, if a query were ever run for more than one type id ... regardless, is it even possible? –  mOrloff Nov 26 '13 at 21:23

2 Answers 2

Did you try to wrap aliases into backqoutes?

SELECT 
  data.segment1 AS `type.segment1`,
  data.segment2 AS `type.segment2`,
  data.segment3 AS `type.segment3`
FROM something_obscure AS data
JOIN obscure_type AS type
ON data.obscure_type_id = type.id
share|improve this answer
    
I think I might have been a little unclear. I'll add a comment to my post to clarify. –  mOrloff Nov 26 '13 at 20:43

Use single quotes around the aliases

SELECT 
  data.segment1 AS 'segment1',
  data.segment2 AS'segment2',
  data.segment3 AS 'segment3'
FROM something_obscure AS data
JOIN obscure_type AS type
ON data.obscure_type_id = type.id

Working fiddle demo

Other demo with type.*

share|improve this answer
    
You should use `back-ticks`, not single-quotes. –  dar7yl Nov 26 '13 at 19:40
1  
@dar7yl i was writing the bacticks but i saw other answer posted using backticks so i changed my answer:) –  M Khalid Junaid Nov 26 '13 at 19:41

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