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I'm having trouble returning a desired value in a recursive call. I want it to always return 0 unless a certain condition is met, in that case it should return 1 and exit.

int check = recursion(a, b, c, d, e, f);
int recursion(int *a, int *b, int c, int d, int e, int f){
    int k, dX, dY;
    for(k=0;k<=b[1]-1;k++){
        dX = b[k*4+3] - e;
        dY = b[k*4+2] - f;
        if(((dX == 1 || dX == -1) && (dY == 0))){
            if(b[k*4+4] == 1) return 1; 
            e = b[k*4+3];
            f = b[k*4+2];
            b[k*4+2] = b[k*4+3] = 0;
            recursion(a, b, c, d, e, f);
        }
        if(((dY == 1 || dY == -1) && (dX == 0))){
            if(b[k*4+4] == 1) return 1;
            e = b[k*4+3];
            f = b[k*4+2];
            b[k*4+2] = b[k*4+3] = 0;
            recursion(a, b, c, d, e, f);      
        }
    }
    return 0;   
}

A lot of irrelevant information has been removed, but as you can see if b[k*4+4] == 1 at anypoint, check should then equal 1. Otherwise, return 0 and check will = 0. It completes a basic traversal, which I know is completing correctly and is even stopping at the terminating condition (b[k*4+4] == 1) but it isn't returning the correct value.

Currently, it is ALWAYS returning 0. Check always equals 0, although it is stopping once the condition is met. I also tried removing the ending return 0; although check still equals zero...

share|improve this question
    
I know that I can pass a pointer to check and simply set check = 1 and then return. I can confirm that this DOES work, but was hoping there was a cleaner way to do this with returns. –  Brandon Smith Nov 26 '13 at 21:32

2 Answers 2

You just need to check the return values of your recursive calls, i.e.,

return recursion(a, b, c, d, e, f);
share|improve this answer
    
This breaks the traversal and it doesn't complete. –  Brandon Smith Nov 26 '13 at 21:52

You need to do return recursion(a, b, c, d, e, f); instead of just recursion(a, b, c, d, e, f);. Otherwise, the result of those recursive calls will be lost.

edit: to not prematurely exit your loop, you can do this:

int check = recursion(a, b, c, d, e, f);
int recursion(int *a, int *b, int c, int d, int e, int f){
    int k, dX, dY;
    for(k=0;k<=b[1]-1;k++){
        dX = b[k*4+3] - e;
        dY = b[k*4+2] - f;
        if(((dX == 1 || dX == -1) && (dY == 0))){
            if(b[k*4+4] == 1) return 1; 
            e = b[k*4+3];
            f = b[k*4+2];
            b[k*4+2] = b[k*4+3] = 0;
            if(recursion(a, b, c, d, e, f) == 1)
                return 1;
        }
        if(((dY == 1 || dY == -1) && (dX == 0))){
            if(b[k*4+4] == 1) return 1;
            e = b[k*4+3];
            f = b[k*4+2];
            b[k*4+2] = b[k*4+3] = 0;
            if(recursion(a, b, c, d, e, f) == 1)
                return 1;   
        }
    }
    return 0;   
}
share|improve this answer
    
This breaks the traversal and it doesn't complete. –  Brandon Smith Nov 26 '13 at 21:48
    
you still need to find a way to use your recursive call. At the moment all you are doing is calling the function and then discarding the return, which is effectively useless. Perhaps you want to set a flag that conditionally switches to 1, then you can return that at the end of your function? –  Red Alert Nov 26 '13 at 23:06
    
That makes sense. Utilizing a flag that passes through to future calls and returns upon exit would work. Thanks @Red Alert! –  Brandon Smith Nov 26 '13 at 23:13
    
Now that I think about it you don't even need a flag, if you did if( recursion(...) == 1){ return 1; }, you'd get the desired functionality. –  Red Alert Nov 27 '13 at 0:47

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