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Say I want to calculate a value for every point on a grid. I would define some function func that takes two values x and y as parameters and returns a third value. In the example below, calculating this value requires a look-up in an external dictionary. I would then generate a grid of points and evaluate func on each of them to get my desired result.

The code below does precisely this, but in a somewhat roundabout way. First I reshape both the X and Y coordinate matrices into one-dimensional arrays, calculate all the values, and then reshape the result back into a matrix. My questions is, can this be done in a more elegant manner?

import collections as c

# some arbitrary lookup table
a = c.defaultdict(int)
a[1] = 2
a[2] = 3
a[3] = 2
a[4] = 3

def func(x,y):
    # some arbitrary function
    return a[x] + a[y]

X,Y = np.mgrid[1:3, 1:4]
X = X.T
Y = Y.T

Z = np.array([func(x,y) for (x,y) in zip(X.ravel(), Y.ravel())]).reshape(X.shape)
print Z

The purpose of this code is to generate a set of values that I can use with pcolor in matplotlib to create a heatmap-type plot.

share|improve this question
    
codereview.stackoverflow.com is probably a better place for this –  Joran Beasley Nov 26 '13 at 21:43
    
I believe that X.reshape(X.size) is the same as X.ravel() –  mgilson Nov 26 '13 at 21:43
2  
You might also want to look into numpy.vectorize. –  mgilson Nov 26 '13 at 21:45
    
mgilson, you're right. Thanks! –  juniper- Nov 26 '13 at 21:45

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

I'd use numpy.vectorize to "vectorize" your function. Note that despite the name, vecotrize is not intended to make your code run faster -- Just simplify it a bit.

Here's some examples:

>>> import numpy as np
>>> @np.vectorize
... def foo(a, b):
...    return a + b
... 
>>> foo([1,3,5], [2,4,6])
array([ 3,  7, 11])
>>> foo(np.arange(9).reshape(3,3), np.arange(9).reshape(3,3))
array([[ 0,  2,  4],
       [ 6,  8, 10],
       [12, 14, 16]])

With your code, it should be enough to decorate func with np.vectorize and then you can probably just call it as func(X, Y) -- No raveling or reshapeing necessary:

import numpy as np
import collections as c

# some arbitrary lookup table
a = c.defaultdict(int)
a[1] = 2
a[2] = 3
a[3] = 2
a[4] = 3

@np.vectorize
def func(x,y):
    # some arbitrary function
    return a[x] + a[y]

X,Y = np.mgrid[1:3, 1:4]
X = X.T
Y = Y.T

Z = func(X, Y)
share|improve this answer
    
This is exactly what I was looking for. Thanks!!! –  juniper- Nov 26 '13 at 21:56

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