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I want to evaluate a T parameter to perform a common behavior.

I was trying to do call this method from differents buttons

private void Execute<T>(string strValue)
{
     //Do operations
     this.SaveObject<T>();
}

Button1

this.Execute<Employee>("somevalue1");

Button2

this.Execute<Supplier>("somevalue2");

but then the problem is when I want to define the SaveObject method at that point how can I evaluate the T. I tried this but I tells me the T is a parameter and I'm using it as a variable.

private void SaveObject<T>()
{
    //Here the problem
    if(T is Employee)
    {
        //Do something
    }
    if(T is Supplier)
    {
        //Do something
    }
}

I want to know what kind of type is and then do my specific operations. All the objects inherit EntityObject

------EDIT------

At the moment of the question, the only thing that I needed to fix my problem was the "answer comment" from Silvermind. (typeof(T)) Then I took the approach from many of you to improve the architecture.

If Silvermind would have aswered my question as answer more than a comment, that would have been my accepted answer.

Anyway, thanks to all of you guys.

share|improve this question
9  
Sounds like T is no longer generic then. Give them both a common ISaveableObject interface, and constrain the generic on that. –  asawyer Nov 26 '13 at 21:58
4  
if (typeof(T) == typeof(Employee))) –  Silvermind Nov 26 '13 at 21:58
2  
Your design is totally wrong. –  David Heffernan Nov 26 '13 at 21:59
2  
@DavidHeffernan I would upvote that comment a thousand times. I've had to unravel mistakes like that ingrained into projects, it's not fun. –  asawyer Nov 26 '13 at 22:00
3  
@Silvermind Yes, use reflection in what should be a simple compile time method resolution. (Assuming the next step would be to invoke a type specific method) –  asawyer Nov 26 '13 at 22:04

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

HighCore is correct, if you want to implement this functionality, your best choice would be to create an abstract base class with the supported virtual methods and then override them in type-specific classes which inherit from the abstract base class. Something similar to:

public abstract class BaseManager<T> where T : class {
    public virtual void SaveObject() {
        // Some common save logic if it can be done
    }
}

public class EmployeeManager : BaseManager<Employee> {
    public override void SaveObject() 
    {
        // Your save logic
    }
}

Hope this helps! Good luck!

share|improve this answer
    
That would perhaps be the best choice if one has control over the types in question. Unfortunately, that isn't possible, and so one may have to make run-time decisions based upon the type. –  supercat Nov 26 '13 at 22:22
    
If the solution is set up properly with IoC and an abstract property with the type exists in the BaseManager, then you can inject IEnumerable<IManager> into the constructor and then SingleOrDefault the correct concrete manager based on type...if one doesn't have control over the types being used ahead of time. (This solution assume that an IManager or other interface exists that the container can resolve against.) –  ohiodoug Nov 26 '13 at 22:27
    
HighCore is correct - Thanks =). This is why I don't get too much rep lately. I keep commenting these questions and leaving it up for other people to create answers. +1 –  HighCore Nov 26 '13 at 22:50

You can use typeof(T) from within your generic method.

EDIT

To give clarification (for those people who love downvoting :-) ), you can then use this information in your method as follows:

    private void SaveObject<T>()
    {
        //Here the problem
        if (typeof(Employee).IsAssignableFrom(typeof(T)))
        {
            //Do something
        }
    }

Apologies for not being as explicit before.

share|improve this answer
2  
Yes, but then what? –  David Heffernan Nov 26 '13 at 22:04
    
@DavidHeffernan I really love downvoting these kind of non-answers. –  HighCore Nov 26 '13 at 22:06
    
The clarification is for everyone. The downvoters surely know how to use System.Type. –  David Heffernan Nov 26 '13 at 22:17
    
@DavidHeffernan - fair enough - thanks for prompting me to improve my answer. –  Lawrence Nov 26 '13 at 22:22

If you find yourself writing generic code where you are saying

if (typeof(T)==typeof(SomeType))

Most likely there is some error in your logic. You might want to do method overloading. If you only know how to handle SomeType and SomeOtherType then why not have a Save(SomeType), Save(SomeOtherType).

If you can maybe you can make your types conform to an Interface or have a base class. That way you can redefine it like so and move the effort of saving the item on itself and keep all the prep and post logic in the handler thread::

void Save<T>(T item) where T:ICanSave
{
       //prep code here
      item.Save()
       //finalize code here
}

Of course, perhaps your object doesn't need to know how to save itself, so you may want to move the implementation into a provider so that there is a SaveProvider<T>, and so any arbitrary item can be saved provided somebody sends you a provider...

void Save<T>(T item,SaveProvider<T> provider){
       //prep code here
      provider.Save(item)
      //finalize code here
}

Of course you can probably default this stuff too.

share|improve this answer
    
If a method is called with arguments of a generic type, method and overloads are only considered if they would be satisfied by the generic type's constraints. If a generic type's constraints don't satisfy an overload, the overload will not be used with any generic type--even types which would satisfy their requirements. –  supercat Nov 26 '13 at 22:19
    
I think you wouldn't really need a generic type constraint for the first when you only call a Save method on the interface. I mean I would just say: void Save(ICanSave item) { item.Save(); }. –  Silvermind Nov 26 '13 at 22:24
1  
This isn't so much an "error in logic" as an "error in design". –  Simon Whitehead Nov 26 '13 at 22:27
    
@SilverMind,That's true about the ICanSave, but maybe Save adds it to a List<T>, or maybe it news up ICanSave, we don't know what else happens in the prep and finalizing steps. @simon whitehead, you are completely correct. Sorry, I wrote this quickly. –  Michael B Nov 26 '13 at 23:07

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