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my_list1 = [30,34,56]
my_list2 = [29,500,43]

How to I check if all values in list are above 30? my_list1 should work and my_list2 should not.

The only thing I could think of doing was:

boolean = 0
def func(ls):
    for k in ls:
        if k > 30:
            boolean = boolean + 1
        else:
            boolean = 0
    if boolean > 0:
        print 'Continue'
    elif boolean = 0:
        pass
share|improve this question
    
A general issues to be aware of: 1) the assigned boolean variable is local to the function (as there is no appropriate global annotation), and 2) boolean = 0 is an assignment, not a comparison. –  user2864740 Nov 26 '13 at 23:12
    
Note that your my_list1 has one value that is not above 30. It is instead equal to 30. Should that be 31 instead, or are you testing for greater than or equal to 30 here? –  Martijn Pieters Nov 26 '13 at 23:20

4 Answers 4

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Use the all() function with a generator expression:

>>> my_list1 = [30, 34, 56]
>>> my_list2 = [29, 500, 43]
>>> all(i >= 30 for i in my_list1)
True
>>> all(i >= 30 for i in my_list2)
False

Note that this tests for greater than or equal to 30, otherwise my_list1 would not pass the test either.

If you wanted to do this in a function, you'd use:

def all_30_or_up(ls):
    for i in ls:
        if i < 30:
            return False
    return True

e.g. as soon as you find a value that proves that there is a value below 30, you return False, and return True if you found no evidence to the contrary.

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What is the advantage of using all_30_or_up over all? Shouldn't all also stop consuming the iterator as soon as a negative has been found? Would be quite dumb otherwise, wouldn't it? –  Hyperboreus Nov 26 '13 at 23:13
    
@Hyperboreus: both stop as soon as a negative has been found. I wanted to give the OP a different way of looking at the problem, giving them a function to replace the one they were writing. –  Martijn Pieters Nov 26 '13 at 23:14

There is a builtin function all:

all (x > limit for x in my_list)

Being limit the value greater than which all numbers must be.

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As my_list1 should test True, the test should almost certainly be >= 30, not > 30. –  Martijn Pieters Nov 26 '13 at 23:03
1  
Well, when OP's question text contradicts itself, who am I to judge which is the correct limit. –  Hyperboreus Nov 26 '13 at 23:06

You can use all():

my_list1 = [30,34,56]
my_list2 = [29,500,43]
if all(i >= 30 for i in my_list1):
    print 'yes'
if all(i >= 30 for i in my_list2):
    print 'no'

Note that this includes all numbers equal to 30 or higher, not strictly above 30.

share|improve this answer
    
As my_list1 should test True, the test should almost certainly be >= 30, not > 30. –  Martijn Pieters Nov 26 '13 at 23:03
    
@MartijnPieters thanks, now updated. Question mentions above 30 but >= 30 seems intended. –  Simeon Visser Nov 26 '13 at 23:03
    
I know, that's why I made that explicit. :-) –  Martijn Pieters Nov 26 '13 at 23:06

...any reason why you can't use min()?

def above(my_list, minimum):
    if min(my_list) >= minimum:
        print "All values are equal or above", minimum
    else:
        print "Not all values are equal or above", minimum

I don't know if this is exactly what you want, but technically, this is what you asked for...

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1  
The disadvantage of this solution is, that each item of list must be touched. –  Hyperboreus Nov 26 '13 at 23:14
1  
I did a little profiling on this. all shortcircuits, so it's much faster if the list does not qualify. But if the list is all 30+, min can be faster. I tested with two 1000-element lists of random integers, one filled with random.randint(0, 100) (failing) and one filled with random.randint(30, 100). Using min took slightly less than half the time on the 30-100 list. But all took about 2% of the time that min did on the 0-100 list, so it probably wins unless failing lists are very rare. –  Peter DeGlopper Nov 26 '13 at 23:17
    
You are both right! Thanks! –  Roberto Nov 26 '13 at 23:20
1  
As it turned out, the first element of my 0-100 list was below 30, so my test was kind of degenerate. Forcing the first sub-30 element to be halfway through the list, min comes out a bit faster - 0.25s for 10000 repetitions rather than 0.32s for all. So which is faster depends on the nature of the data, as you'd expect. –  Peter DeGlopper Nov 26 '13 at 23:24

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