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I have the following ScriptBlock defined:

[ScriptBlock]$strSb = {
    param(
        [Parameter(Mandatory=$false,Position=0)]
        [String[]]$Modules = @('String3','String4')
    )
    Write-Host "Passed in params:"
    foreach($m in $Modules){
        Write-Host $m
    }
    $defaultModules = @('String3','String4')
    # Add Default Modules back if not present #
    foreach($module in $defaultModules){
        if($Modules -notcontains $module){
            $Modules += $module
        }
    }
    Write-Host "Final set:"
    # Load Dependencies #
    foreach($m in $Modules){
        Write-Host $m
    }
}

As the parameter states in the ScriptBlock, I want to be able to pass in an array of strings. When I call $strSb.Invoke(@('String11','String12')) I receive the following:

Passed in params:
String11
Final set:
String11
String3
String4

What I expect is:

Passed in params:
String11
String12
Final set:
String11
String12
String3
String4

Why is the invoke method truncating my array to the first item entered? And how would I go about fixing it so I can pass in an array of strings?

FWIW: I'm working in v2 and v3.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The problem is that the Invoke method takes an array of arguments (kind of like commands that have an -ArgumentList parameter), so each element in your array is parsed as a separate argument. The first argument, 'String11', is assigned to the first postitional parameter, $Modules, and any subsequent arguments are discarded, since there are no more positional parameters. It doesn't matter that $Modules is declared as a string array; since each element of the argument list is a separate argument, you're setting $Modules to an array of one element.

If you use the , operator to indicate that you're passing in a single array argument, it works as intended:

$strSb.Invoke((,@('String11','String12')))

BTW, you don't really need the @, because a comma-separated list of strings is interpreted as an array by default. Not just in this particular context, but in general. So just use this:

$strSb.Invoke((,('String11','String12')))

To prove out the explanation above, try this scriptblock, which is the same except that a second parameter (creatively named $SecondParameter) is declared, and then displayed after the loop that displays the value of the first parameter:

[ScriptBlock]$strSb = {
    param(
        [Parameter(Mandatory=$false,Position=0)]
        [String[]]$Modules = @('String3','String4'),
        [String]$SecondParameter
    )
    Write-Host "Passed in params:"
    foreach($m in $Modules){
        Write-Host $m
    }
    Write-Host "`nSecondParameter: $SecondParameter`n"
    $defaultModules = @('String3','String4')
    # Add Default Modules back if not present #
    foreach($module in $defaultModules){
        if($Modules -notcontains $module){
            $Modules += $module
        }
    }
    Write-Host "Final set:"
    # Load Dependencies #
    foreach($m in $Modules){
        Write-Host $m
    }
}

If you then pass in the arguments as you were, $strSb.Invoke(@('String11','String12')), you get these results:

11-26-13 19:02:12.55 D:\Scratch\soscratch» $strSb.Invoke(@('String11','String12'))
Passed in params:
String11

SecondParameter: String12

Final set:
String11
String3
String4
11-26-13 19:02:29.34 D:\Scratch\soscratch»

One last tip, not directly related to the question, is that you can compact the foreach loops by using a pipelines, which is are not only more succinct but generally more efficient. Here's a compacted version of your code:

[ScriptBlock]$strSb = {
    param(
        [Parameter(Mandatory=$false,Position=0)] 
        [String[]]$Modules = ('String3','String4')
    )
    Write-Host "Passed in params:"
    $Modules | Write-Host
    $defaultModules = 'String3','String4'
    # Add Default Modules back if not present #
    $defaultModules | ?{$Modules -notcontains $_} | %{$Modules += $_}
    Write-Host "Final set:"
    # Load Dependencies #
    $Modules | Write-Host
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! That is what I was looking for. My continued investigation was leading me to believe it was seeing the array as the parameter list. This answers how to get it to see the array as a parameter. It will take me a few days to confirm this is working. I will mark this as the answer when I do. –  beavel Nov 27 '13 at 4:56

If I understand what you're doing, you want to take 2 arrays, concatenate them, and ensure uniqueness...

First, Since you have a [Parameter...] on your parameter, you magically get [CmdletBinding()] on the method. This means that you are automatically going to get $Modules split into multiple calls.

Second, ScriptBlock.Invoke() takes a params style array and puts them into the method as separate arguments.

The first thing I would try is to add the attribute to gather all values:

[Parameter(ValueFromRemainingArguments=$true, Position=0, Mandatory=$true)]
       [String[]]$Modules

However, for the Join, you can much more easily do something like:

($modules + $defaultModules) | Select -Unique
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the suggestions, but the ValueFromRemainingArguments didn't work for some reason. It was still only using the first value. I did end up using the Join suggestion. –  beavel Nov 29 '13 at 20:45

Not sure exactly why, but it doesn't seem to like that named parameter. Seems to like $args, tho :

[ScriptBlock]$strSb = {
  $Modules = $args
  Write-Host "Passed in params:"
  foreach($m in $modules){
      Write-Host $m

   }
   $defaultModules = @('String3','String4')
   # Add Default Modules back if not present #
   foreach($module in $defaultModules){
       if($Modules -notcontains $module){
           $Modules += $module
       }
   }
   Write-Host "Final set:"
   # Load Dependencies #
   foreach($m in $Modules){
       Write-Host $m
   }
}


$strSb.Invoke('String11','String12')

Passed in params:
String11
String12
Final set:
String11
String12
String3
String4
share|improve this answer

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