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I'm trying to put together a DSL-like set of functions in scala, and what I want is something to the effect of...

implicit val x = 1

doSomething()         // uses x

context { implicit y =>
  doSomething()       // uses y
  doSomethingElse()   // uses y
}

Where context is something to the effect of...

def context[A](f: Int => A) = f(2)

The issue I run into is that with this syntax, scala will report, ambiguous implicit values. I had kinda assumed that if an implicit was defined in a "closer" scope that it would be taken over the farther one but it doesn't seem like that's the case.

Is there a way to signal to scala that one implicit is more specific than the other (aside from what I thought would be a stronger scope)?

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2 Answers 2

One possible solution is to name the inner parameter to the same as the outer parameter.

context { implicit y =>

to

context { implicit x =>

This works but is less preferable. Any better solutions?

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This might not be exactly what you are looking for, but it is sort of related so perhaps it'll give you some ideas.

You could subtype the class of the implicit and take advantage of the fact that the most specific type will be chosen:

scala> :paste
// Entering paste mode (ctrl-D to finish)

  class A { override def toString = "A" }
  class B extends A { override def toString = "B" }

  implicit val a = new A
  implicit val b = new B

  def foo()(implicit x: A) { println(x) }

// Exiting paste mode, now interpreting.

defined class A
defined class B
a: A = A
b: B = B
foo: ()(implicit x: A)Unit

scala> foo()
B

Here we have defined the foo method to take an implicit parameter of type A. We have to implicit vals of type A in scope, a and b, but b is more specific, and as such there is no ambiguity and the output shows that b is chosen.

Let's try to adapt it to your example:

class A
class B extends A

def foo()(implicit a: A) = a

def bar[U](p: B => U) { p(new B) }

implicit val a = new A

bar { implicit b =>
  foo()
}

The trick here is to use the subtyped class in the paremeter to the bar method (your context).

A little extended example to prove that it works:

scala> :paste
// Entering paste mode (ctrl-D to finish)

  class A {
    override def toString = "A"
    def getB = new B
  }

  class B extends A {
    override def toString = "B"
  }

  def foo()(implicit a: A) { println(a) }

  def bar[U](p: B => U)(implicit a: A) { p(a.getB) }

  implicit val a = new A

  def test() {

    foo()  // should print "A"

    bar { implicit b =>
      foo()  // should print "B"
    }
  }   

// Exiting paste mode, now interpreting.

defined class A
defined class B
foo: ()(implicit a: A)Unit
bar: [U](p: B => U)(implicit a: A)Unit
a: A = A
test: ()Unit

scala> test()
A
B

There are two possible gotchas here: B must extend A, if you forget that, it will print "A" in both cases. And similar if you forget putting the implicit keyword on the parameter in the call to bar.

What you have gained here is the ability to call fooin different contexts with different values of A without specifying them explicitly.

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That is a really interesting trick and I think it solves the exact problem I was looking to solve. I will give that a go in my use case and mark it as answered if it works (and it seems to do so). –  T. Stone Dec 2 '13 at 17:35

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