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I have a LINQ query that looks like this:

public IEnumerable<Foo> SelectFooBars()
{
    return
        from
            f in foos
        join
            b in bars
            on f.BarId equals b.Id
        select
            AddMissingProp(f, b.MissingProp);
}

public void AddMissingProp(Foo foo, string missingProp) // substitute this with inline lambda
{
    foo.MissingProp = missingProp;
    return foo;
}

I would like to get rid of AddMissingProp and use some form of a lambda in my select clause instead.

I attempted...

...
select
    (f, b) => { f.MissingProp = b.MissingProp; return f }

...but I got the following error:

A local variable named 'f' cannot be declared in this scope because it would give a different meaning to 'f', which is already used in a 'parent or current' scope to denote something else.

How can I "lambda-ize" my query?


Update

This also doesn't work:

...
select
    () => { f.MissingProp = b.MissingProp; return f }

I get the following error:

The type of one of the expressions in the join clause is incorrect. Type inference failed in the call to 'Join'.

I didn't change the join clause at all, so I'm perplexed.

share|improve this question
1  
I don't know the LINQ syntax well enough to write it out, but wouldn't it be better do the mutating in a foreach(yourLinqQuery) statement? Having a select mutate the objects seems confusing. –  user24359 Jan 7 '10 at 20:20
    
try on f.BarId equals b.Id –  Doc Brown Jan 7 '10 at 20:36
    
@Doc Brown, that was actually just a typo in my example (my real code says equals). Fixed now. –  devuxer Jan 7 '10 at 20:56

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can give types to your parameters in a lambda expression but you need to use different names since you're already using f and b in the query.

(Foo f1, Bar b1) => ...

Edit

return
(
    from 
        f in foos 
    join
        b in bars 
        on f.BarId equals b.Id 
    select 
        new {f, b}
).select(foobar => {foobar.f.BarId = foobar.b.Id; return foobar.f});
share|improve this answer
    
this wouldn't work either. –  Stan R. Jan 7 '10 at 20:28
    
This doesn't work. It doesn't know that it should be passing in f and b. I also get the same error as if I use () => { ... } (see my update). –  devuxer Jan 7 '10 at 20:28
    
See my edit please... –  Rodrick Chapman Jan 7 '10 at 20:50
    
Second times the charm :) Well, except the second from should be a join. But, otherwise, this is my favorite solution so far. –  devuxer Jan 7 '10 at 21:28
    
I noticed another minor problem...it should be {foobar.f.BarId = foobar.b.Id; return foobar.f};. Alternatively, you could explicitly define the property names for the anonymous type in new {f, b} like this: new { foo = f, bar = b}. –  devuxer Jan 7 '10 at 21:37

I think icambron is right, IMHO the better readable version is this:

  var fooBar = from 
                 f in foos
               join 
                 b in bars
                 on f.BarId equals b.Id 
               select new {f,b};

   foreach(var x in fooBar)
        x.f.MissingProp = x.b.MissingProp;

   // EDIT due to comments: add this if you 
   // need IEnumerable<Foo> returned
   return fooBar.Select(fb => fb.f);

The from join select statements are for queries, they should not be misused for mutating the contents of a sequence.

EDIT: Here is another link providing some insights why using a functional form of ForEach is not a good idea.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks +1. I had thought about using foreach but I guess I was trying to be too fancy :) This is a good solution. –  devuxer Jan 7 '10 at 20:58
    
Oops, one problem. This leaves me with an IEnumerable<anonymous_type_foo_bar_mashup> but I need an IEnumerable<foo>. I think if you add return fooBar.Select(fb => fb.f); to your answer, it will be correct. –  devuxer Jan 7 '10 at 21:09
2  
You should also be able to do var foobar = (....).ForEach(....); and one line it! –  Chris Marisic Jan 7 '10 at 21:24
    
@DanThMan: edited it, but you should change the return type of AddMissingProp to make the original question fit to the edited answe :-) –  Doc Brown Jan 7 '10 at 21:38
    
@Chris: ForEach works on Array<>, not on IEnumerable<>. And I don't think this will make it better readable. –  Doc Brown Jan 7 '10 at 21:43

select (f2, b2) => { f2.MissingProp = b2.MissingProp; return f2 }

share|improve this answer
    
this wouldn't work. –  Stan R. Jan 7 '10 at 20:26
    
This doesn't work. It doesn't know that it should be passing in f and b. I also get the same error as if I use () => { ... } (see my update). –  devuxer Jan 7 '10 at 20:29

Rewrite this with Lambda syntax.

var vf2 = foos.Join(bars, f => f.id, b => b.id, (foo, bar) => { foo.MissingProp = bar.MissingProp; return foo; });

If you need explanation of this syntax, let me know.

share|improve this answer
    
For some reason, this causes an error with the join clause (even though I didn't change the join clause): The type of one of the expressions in the join clause is incorrect. Type inference failed in the call to 'Join'. –  devuxer Jan 7 '10 at 20:11
    
thats because when you do select you are telling it which type to return, select () assumes you are returning a delegate type. I think you should stick with your method. –  Stan R. Jan 7 '10 at 20:22
    
Hmm...maybe it just can't be done. But why can't it infer the return type from return f;? It knows f is a Foo. –  devuxer Jan 7 '10 at 20:33
    
Updated answer Dan. –  Stan R. Jan 7 '10 at 20:34
    
@Dan, thats because select () is implying select new delegate, not select new Foo. –  Stan R. Jan 7 '10 at 20:38

If the compiler isn't able to infer the correct type to pass to a lambda, you can of course specify the type yourself.

This should work fine:

select
    (Foo f2, b) => { f2.MissingProp = b.MissingProp; return f2; }

Note that as you've already noticed, you cannot reuse fand hope that it will retain its meaning. This is a new method signature, with new parameters, so you need to use a distinct name for it.

When you do, you notice that the compiler isn't able to figure out by itself what type the first argument should be, but you can specify it, like above.

share|improve this answer
    
As for the incomplete code, I forgot my return statement. Just fixed it. –  devuxer Jan 7 '10 at 21:04
    
You've also missed the end semicolon after the Linq query. You should always strive to copy and paste what you have in your code, not try to simplify it. You'd be amazed at what people here is able to read of code :) –  Lasse V. Karlsen Jan 7 '10 at 21:06
    
removed last part of answer to reflect edited question. –  Lasse V. Karlsen Jan 7 '10 at 21:07
    
Not able to get your solution to work. Even if I use (Foo f2, Bar b) instead of (Foo f2, b), I still get flagged for my join clause. –  devuxer Jan 7 '10 at 21:20
    
I agree about copy/paste...in this case, there was proprietary info in my code, however. –  devuxer Jan 7 '10 at 21:21

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