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I'm writing an ASP.NET application. I have a textbox on a webform, and I want to force whatever the user types to upper case. I'd like to do this on the front end. You should also note that there is a validation control on this textbox, so I want to make sure the solution doesn't interfere with the ASP.NET validation.

Clarification: It appears that the CSS text transform makes the user input appear in uppercase. However, under the hood, it's still lower case as the validation control fails. You see, my validation control checks to see if a valid state code is entered, however the regular expression I'm using only works with uppercase characters.

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1  
Are you intentionally limiting your regex to only working with uppercase characters? By your wording it sounds like you might not be aware that regex implementations typically support a case-sensitive switch. –  J c Oct 14 '08 at 19:27
    
I'm not a regex expert. I know of know way to support both upper and lower case State code comparisions in the regex beside duplicating every state code twice (upper and lower). I thought it would be cleaner just converting the input box to uppercase. –  Aheho Oct 14 '08 at 19:37
3  
No worries - I'd recommend using something like the following (C#) instead of modifying the user input though: Regex re = new Regex("myExpression", RegexOptions.IgnoreCase); –  J c Oct 17 '08 at 11:57
    
I have the same exact problem. I am setting text-transform as uppercase to set the appearance of the textbox as the user types, and I'm using the onblur event to set the value to uppercase once the textbox loses focus. The validator however isn't happy with the value. Had you found a solution to this problem? –  Fikre Mar 18 '10 at 20:49
    
why not provide a dropdown for statecode instead? –  RandomUs1r Sep 17 at 17:10

19 Answers 19

Why not use a combination of the CSS and backend? Use:

style='text-transform:uppercase' 

on the TextBox, and in your codebehind use:

Textbox.Value.ToUpper();

You can also easily change your regex on the validator to use lowercase and uppercase letters. That's probably the easier solution than forcing uppercase on them.

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2  
I'd go with ToUpper(). Why would you want to enforce such restrictions on the end-user? That's not a friendly UI. Take whatever the user gives you and make it upper case yourself. –  Kon Oct 14 '08 at 21:36
    
I would do this too. Messing around in Javascript until you have what you want is much more work, and you require Javascript to be enabled which is simply unnecessary with Rorschach's solution. –  Rob Sep 7 '10 at 11:35

Use a CSS style on the text box. Your CSS should be something like this:

.uppercase
{
    text-transform: uppercase;
}

<asp:TextBox ID="TextBox1" runat="server" Text="" CssClass="uppercase"></asp:TextBox>;
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2  
The REGEX validator will still fail with a purely CSS solution. –  Stephen Wrighton Oct 14 '08 at 21:37

Okay, after testing, here is a better, cleaner solution.

$('#FirstName').bind('keyup', function () {

    // Get the current value of the contents within the text box
    var val = $('#FirstName').val().toUpperCase();

    // Reset the current value to the Upper Case Value
    $('#FirstName').val(val);

});
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You can intercept the key press events, cancel the lowercase ones, and append their uppercase versions to the input:

window.onload = function () {
    var input = document.getElementById("test");

    input.onkeypress = function () {
        // So that things work both on Firefox and Internet Explorer.
        var evt = arguments[0] || event;
        var char = String.fromCharCode(evt.which || evt.keyCode);

        // Is it a lowercase character?
        if (/[a-z]/.test(char)) {
            // Append its uppercase version
            input.value += char.toUpperCase();

            // Cancel the original event
            evt.cancelBubble = true;
            return false;
        }
    }
};

This works in both Firefox and Internet Explorer. You can see it in action here.

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5  
But it doesn't work if the user tries to type in the middle of the text. –  erikkallen Sep 27 '09 at 16:37
**I would do like:
<asp:TextBox ID="txtName" onkeyup="this.value=this.value.toUpperCase()" runat="server"></asp:TextBox>**
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<!-- Script by hscripts.com -->
<script language=javascript>
    function upper(ustr)
    {
        var str=ustr.value;
        ustr.value=str.toUpperCase();
    }

    function lower(ustr)
    {
        var str=ustr.value;
        ustr.value=str.toLowerCase();
    }
</script>

<form>
    Type Lower-case Letters<textarea name="address" onkeyup="upper(this)"></textarea>
</form>

<form>
    Type Upper-case Letters<textarea name="address" onkeyup="lower(this)"></textarea>
</form>
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I just did something similar today. Here is the modified version:

<asp:TextBox ID="txtInput" runat="server"></asp:TextBox>
<script type="text/javascript">
    function setFormat() {
        var inp = document.getElementById('ctl00_MainContent_txtInput');
        var x = inp.value;
        inp.value = x.toUpperCase();
    }

    var inp = document.getElementById('ctl00_MainContent_txtInput');
    inp.onblur = function(evt) {
        setFormat();
    };
</script>

Basically, the script attaches an event that fires when the text box loses focus.

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I don't get this. Where did you get the id 'ctl00_MainContent_txtInput' from? –  Aheho Oct 15 '08 at 1:25
    
ASP.NET translates your IDs. You can figure them out by viewing the source of the page you are working with. ctl00 is the generic prefix (but it can be different), MainContent just happened to be the name of the Form that the control was placed in. –  Jason Z Oct 15 '08 at 3:36
1  
Couldn't this potentially break when moving to a newer version of ASP.NET? –  Aheho Oct 15 '08 at 11:55
1  
Possibly, but you could always use a unique text box name and a JavaScript framework like jQuery and find the control where the unique name matches a pattern. I was trying to keep the sample code simple. –  Jason Z Oct 15 '08 at 12:54
6  
There's a better way to get the client id -> <%= TextBox1.ClientID %>. That would render the correct ID. –  Cyril Gupta Aug 28 '09 at 4:52

I would do this using jQuery.

<script src="Scripts/jquery-1.3.2.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
<script type="text/javascript">
    $(document).ready(function() {
        $("#txt").keydown(function(e) {
            if (e.keyCode >= 65 & e.keyCode <= 90) {
                val1 = $("#txt").val();
                $("#txt").val(val1 + String.fromCharCode(e.keyCode));
                return false;
            }
        });
    });
</script>

You must have the jQuery library in the /script folder.

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This version works as the user types. –  Cyril Gupta Aug 28 '09 at 5:34
2  
except for when you're typing in the middle of the text –  Anthony Shaw Mar 7 '12 at 21:48

I have done some analysis about this issue on four popular browser versions.

  1. the style tag simple displays the characters in uppercase but, the control value still remains as lowercase
  2. the keypress functionality using the char code displayed above is a bit worry some as in firefox chrome and safari it disables the feature to Ctrl + V into the control.
  3. the other issue with using character level to upper case is also not translating the whole string to upper case.
  4. the answer I found is to implement this on keyup in conjunction with the style tag.

    <-- form name="frmTest" -->
    <-- input type="text" size=100 class="ucasetext" name="textBoxUCase" id="textBoxUCase" -->
    <-- /form -->
    
    window.onload = function() {
        var input = document.frmTest.textBoxUCase;
        input.onkeyup = function() {
            input.value = input.value.toUpperCase();
        }
    };
    
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Set the style on the textbox as text-transform: uppercase?

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Read the clarification in the question itself. That only changes the appearance but not the underlying value in the textbox. –  Aheho Aug 31 '11 at 17:26
 style='text-transform:uppercase'
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Use the text-transform CSS for the front-end and then use the toUpper method on your string server-side before you validate.

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The validation control that's failing runs client-side. –  Aheho Oct 14 '08 at 19:39

CSS could be of help here.

style="text-transform: uppercase";"

does this help?

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here is a solution that worked for me.

http://plugins.jquery.com/project/bestupper

You have to get the JavaScript from http://plugins.jquery.com/files/jquery.bestupper.min.js.txt and there you go.

Works like a charm!

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I use a simple one inline statement

<asp:TextBox ID="txtLocatorName" runat="server"
 style="text-transform:uppercase" CssClass="textbox"  
 TabIndex="1">
</asp:TextBox>

If you don't want to use css classes you can just use inline style statement. :)

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This answer has been supplied and the reason why it's not sufficient is explained in the question. –  EWit Jun 19 at 6:47
    
It's fine. Somebody else can benefit with this. Although I don't think it should be accepted. –  Earth Engine Jun 19 at 6:55
    
text-transform only changes the appearance, it doesn't force the underlying value to uppercase. –  Aheho Jun 19 at 12:25

I realize it is a bit late, but I couldn't find a good answer that worked with ASP.NET AJAX, so I fixed the code above:

function ToUpper() {
        // So that things work both on FF and IE
        var evt = arguments[0] || event;
        var char = String.fromCharCode(evt.which || evt.keyCode);

        // Is it a lowercase character?
        if (/[a-z]/.test(char)) {
            // convert to uppercase version
            if (evt.which) {
                evt.which = char.toUpperCase().charCodeAt(0);
            }
            else {
                evt.keyCode = char.toUpperCase().charCodeAt(0);
            }
        }

        return true;
    }

Used like so:

       <asp:TextBox ID="txtAddManager" onKeyPress="ToUpper()" runat="server" 
             Width="84px" Font-Names="Courier New"></asp:TextBox>
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Thank you. I posted this code in stackoverflow.com/questions/8026535/… . It fail if paste command (Ctrl+V or from context menu) is used. How to make it work with paste command also ? –  Andrus Nov 6 '11 at 19:20

JavaScript has the "toUpperCase()" function of a string.

So, something along these lines:

function makeUpperCase(this)
{
    this.value = this.value.toUpperCase();
}
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That will only change it after, no as they type it. –  Diodeus Oct 14 '08 at 19:02
    
You could append this function to the onchange event of the text area and it would update it on the fly, though it would be a little bit slow. CSS is the way to go IMHO. –  Tom Oct 14 '08 at 19:20
2  
@diodeus - if you use TextChange event then it'll occur as they top. @Tom - does the CSS actually change the underlying ASCI or just how it's displayed? –  Stephen Wrighton Oct 14 '08 at 20:10
1  
@Stephen - That's a really good question! I created a small page to test this out and it appears that CSS only changes the way that it appears not the underlying ASCII. –  Tom Oct 14 '08 at 21:18
1  
@Tom - That's what I thought, as such, it needs to occur via JS rather than CSS in order for the validator to fire correctly –  Stephen Wrighton Oct 14 '08 at 21:36
  <telerik:RadTextBox ID="txtCityName" runat="server" MaxLength="50" Width="200px"
                            Style="text-transform: uppercase;">
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     $().ready(docReady);

     function docReady() {

            $("#myTextbox").focusout(uCaseMe);
     }

     function uCaseMe() {

            var val = $(this).val().toUpperCase();

            // Reset the current value to the Upper Case Value
            $(this).val(val);
        }

This is a reusable approach. Any number of textboxes can be done this way w/o naming them. A page wide solution could be achieved by changing the selector in docReady.

My example uses lost focus, the question did not specify as they type. You could trigger on change if thats important in your scenario.

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