Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following data:

  1 3 4 2 6 7 8 8 93 23 45 2 0 0 0 1
  0 3 4 2 6 7 8 8 90 23 45 2 0 0 0 1
  0 3 4 2 6 7 8 6 93 23 45 2 0 0 0 1
  -1 3 4 2 6 7 8 8 21 23 45 2 0 0 0 1
  -1 3 4 2 6 7 8 8 0 23 45 2 0 0 0 1

The above data is in a file. I want to count the number of 1's,0's,-1's but only in 1st column. I am taking the file in standard input but the only way I could think of is to do like this:

  cnt = 0
  cnt1 = 0
  cnt2 = 0
  for line in sys.stdin:
      (t1, <having 15 different variables as that many columns are in files>) = re.split("\s+", line.strip())
      if re.match("+1", t1):
         cnt = cnt + 1
      if re.match("-1", t1):
         cnt1 = cnt1 + 1
      if re.match("0", t1):
         cnt2 = cnt2 + 1

How can I make it better especially the 15 different variables part as thats the only place where I will be using those variables.

share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Use collections.Counter:

from collections import Counter
with open('abc.txt') as f:
    c = Counter(int(line.split(None, 1)[0]) for line in f)
    print c

Output:

Counter({0: 2, -1: 2, 1: 1})

Here str.split(None, 1) splits the line just once:

>>> s = "1 3 4 2 6 7 8 8 93 23 45 2 0 0 0 1"                                                
>>> s.split(None, 1)
['1', '3 4 2 6 7 8 8 93 23 45 2 0 0 0 1']

Numpy makes it even easy:

>>> import numpy as np
>>> from collections import Counter                                                         
>>> Counter(np.loadtxt('abc.txt', usecols=(0,), dtype=np.int))                                     
Counter({0: 2, -1: 2, 1: 1})
share|improve this answer
    
You should highlight the usage of line.split(None, 1), i.e., the split limit. (and why do you use "None" as the delimiter?) –  justhalf Nov 27 '13 at 9:34
1  
Nested (in-)comprehensions (alright, alright, I know - generator expressions), aarrghh! –  Frerich Raabe Nov 27 '13 at 9:37
1  
None is special-cased to split on sequences of whitespace. Perlishly, if you ask me ... –  tripleee Nov 27 '13 at 9:38

If you only want the first column, then only split the first column. And use a dictionary to store the counts for each value.

count = dict()
for line in sys.stdin:
    (t1, rest) = line.split(' ', 1)
    try:
        count[t1] += 1
    except KeyError:
        count[t1] = 1
for item in count:
    print '%s occurs %i times' % (item, count[item])
share|improve this answer

Instead of using tuple unpacking, where you need a number of variables exactly equal to the number of parts returned by split(), you can just use the first element of those parts:

parts = re.split("\s+", line.strip())
t1 = parts[0]

or equivalently, simply

t1 = re.split("\s+", line.strip())[0]
share|improve this answer
import collections

def countFirstColum(fileName):
    res = collections.defaultdict(int)
    with open(fileName) as f:
    for line in f:
        key = line.split(" ")[0]
        res[key] += 1;
    return res
share|improve this answer
rows = []
for line in f:
    column = line.strip().split(" ")
    rows.append(column)

then you get a 2-dimensional array.

1st column:

for row in rows:
    print row[0]

output:

1
0
0
-1
-1
share|improve this answer

This is from a script of mine with an infile, I checked and it works with standard input as infile:

dictionary = {}

for line in someInfile:
    line = line.strip('\n') # if infile but you should
    f = line.split() #  do your standard input thing
    dictionary[f[0]]=0

for line in someInfile:
    line = line.strip('\n') # if infile but you should
    f = line.split() #  do your standard input thing
    dictionary[f[0]]+=1

print dictionary
share|improve this answer
    
This will produce zero-based counts, on the second field in the file. Maybe use 1 instead of 0 in the if? And f[0] instead of f[1]. –  tripleee Nov 27 '13 at 9:40

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.