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I have a table as shown below.

ID ParentID Node Name  Node Type
------------------------------------------------------------------
525 524  Root   Area Level 1
526 525  C   Area Level 2
527 525  A   Area Level 2
528 525  D   Area Level 2
671 525  E   Area Level 2
660 527  B   Area Level 3
672 671  F   Area Level 3

How can i write a recursive t-sql query to generate below output?

Output ("Root" node not required in the output):

Node  ID
-----------------------
A  527
A/B  660
C  526
D  528
E  671
E/F  672

Thanks

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Which version of SQl server? –  HLGEM Jan 7 '10 at 21:46
    
And will you only need two levels or could there be data where a relates to b relates to c? –  HLGEM Jan 7 '10 at 21:47
    
sql server 2005. There could be more than 2 levels –  stackoverflowuser Jan 7 '10 at 21:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Take a look at this page on using common table expressions. That is what I would use (assuming you are using at least SQL Server 2005)

Here is a code example using your case:

 WITH CTE (NodePath, ID) AS (
    SELECT
        '/' + CAST(NodeName AS NVARCHAR(MAX)) AS NodePath,
        ID
    FROM TABLE
    WHERE NodeName = 'Root'

    UNION ALL

    SELECT
        CTE.NodePath + '/' + CAST(NodeName AS NVARCHAR(MAX)) AS NodePath,
        TABLE.ID
    FROM CTE
    INNER JOIN TABLE ON TABLE.ParentId = CTE.ID
)

SELECT
    NodeName,
    ID
FROM CTE
share|improve this answer
    
@Gabriel, +1, I just wrote same sample code to update my previous answer =) –  Rubens Farias Jan 7 '10 at 21:58
    
is it possible i can do something like "SELECT NodeName, ID FROM CTE" some way to pass level value to this –  Praveen Prasad Jun 22 '11 at 19:12

You could also to take a look on Common Table Expressions (CTE) in SQL Server 2005

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