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I want to parse JSON every few seconds. My idea is by constantly parsing it to see if there are some changes in it and if there are to get them and update my views (mostly TextViews). I have a Fragment, called MyFragment. In its onCreateView I am executing the following: new MyTask().execute(myJSONUrl);. Some code:

        class MyTask extends AsyncTask<String, Void, String> {

        @Override
        protected void onPreExecute() {
            super.onPreExecute();
        }

        @Override
        protected String doInBackground(String... params) {

            //getJSONString(String url) - my method for getting the JSON from URL
            return getJSONString(params[0]);
        }

        @Override
        protected void onPostExecute(String result) {
            super.onPostExecute(result);

        if (result == null || result.length() == 0) {
                Log.w(TAG," JSON IS **null** ");
                Toast.makeText(getActivity().getApplicationContext(), "JSON IS NULL", Toast.LENGTH_SHORT).show();
            } else {
                     try{
                           JSONObject root = new JSONObject(result);

                            // Here i get what i need from the JSONObject and everything works fine.

                         } catch (Exception e) {
                    e.printStackTrace();
                         }
        }

Now how to parse the JSON from URL every n seconds? I have tried using ScheduledExecutorService, Timer and Thread but nothing seems to work. Thanks in advance :-)

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2  
This will murder the battery. Your users will hate you. –  meredrica Nov 27 '13 at 10:30
    
This is really not nice to make a request for every few seconds. You may want to be interested in Google Cloud Messaging, GCM. Search for how you can use it for synchronising your application with the Server. –  osayilgan Nov 27 '13 at 10:31
    
@meredrica I know the consequences :) I guess it will not be so bad because I am planning this parsing to happen only when MyFragment is visible. So you press a tab, MyFragment appears, JSON is parsed, parsing every 5 seconds starts, and if there is a change in the JSON, there will be a change in MyFragment's view. Press another tab, MyFragment is not visible and the parsing is stopped. Any ideas how to do that? :) –  taxo Nov 27 '13 at 11:12
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1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

When you really throw the battery concerns out of the window:

Change class MyTask extends AsyncTask<String, Void, String> to class MyTask extends AsyncTask<String, String, Void>

Do the following:

protected String doInBackground(String... params) {

  //getJSONString(String url) - my method for getting the JSON from URL
  while(isCancelled() == false) {
    try {
      Thread.sleep(1000* 5); // only do this every 5 seconds.
    } catch (InterruptException ex) {}
    publishResult(getJSONString(params[0]));
  }
}
public void onResultPublished(String result) {
  // stuff that happened in onResult before...
}

You emit strings as a result and handle it in onResultPublished (this method is executed on the UI thread so it's safe to modify ui here).

Don't forget to cancel the asynctask.

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I have two questions: 1. publishResult() is onResultPublished() or they are two different methods? 2. Where should I call onResultPublished() - in or out of my class which extends AsyncTask? –  taxo Nov 28 '13 at 14:20
    
EDIT: I suggested that the two methods are the same. First put the method outside from MyClass extends AsyncTask and then inside in it. In both i got "System.err: Only the original thread that created a view hierarchy can touch its views". Any ideas how to proceed? :) –  taxo Nov 28 '13 at 14:32
    
You need to start the async task on the thread that runs your UI. publishResult and onResultPublished are NOT the same they are asynctask methods. The difference is that the Asynctask controlls when onResultPublished is called so that it's ok to mess with the UI (background threads are generally not allowed to change UI) –  meredrica Nov 28 '13 at 15:45
    
Okay, i got it ;) –  taxo Nov 28 '13 at 16:22
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