Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

The NLS_CHARACTERSET is AL23UTF8 in my Oracle database. I have problem when using the RPAD function:

Connected to Oracle Database 11g Enterprise Edition Release 11.2.0.3.0 
Connected as apps@UATSED

SQL> 
SQL> SELECT '甲骨文' ORACLE, LENGTHB('甲骨文') ORACLE_LENGTH,
  2         RPAD('甲骨文', 10, '$') ORA_RPAD, LENGTHB(RPAD('甲骨文', 10, '$')) ORA_RPAD_LENGTH
  3    FROM dual
  4  ;

ORACLE    ORACLE_LENGTH ORA_RPAD      ORA_RPAD_LENGTH
--------- ------------- ------------- ---------------
甲骨文                9 甲骨文$$$$                 13

SQL> 

We know a Chinese character take 3 bytes in AL32UTF8 encoding method. Therefore in my example, the lengthb function returns the correct result. But we I use RPAD function to pad more spaces with $, it took 2 bytes for one Chinese character, not 3 bytes. So when i pad 10 bytes in total, it filled 4 $ signs for me.

My question is why RPAD function don't follow the way like lengthb?

share|improve this question
    
According Oracle doc it should return "甲骨文$$$$$$$": The argument n is the total length of the return value as it is displayed on your terminal screen. do you get any difference if you try RPAD(CAST('甲骨文' AS NVARCHAR2(10)), 10, '$'), RPAD(CAST('甲骨文' AS VARCHAR2(10)), 10, '$')? –  Wernfried Nov 27 '13 at 12:23
    
It's not the case of "甲骨文$$$$$$$", 'cause AL32UTF8 is MULTI-BYTES character set. The method you provided return the same results like I posted above. –  eliuhy Nov 27 '13 at 13:03
    
What if you put the explicit "N" in front of the literal: N'甲骨文' –  Morbo Nov 27 '13 at 22:08
2  
Hi guys, I've got the reason and workarounds by searching from Google. Here is the explanation from Oracle documentation: "The total length of the return value as it is displayed on your terminal screen. In most character sets, this is also the number of characters in the return value. However, in some multibyte character sets, the display length of a character string can differ from the number of characters in the string." And workarounds depend on the actual display length in your screen (View text in monospaced fonts) –  eliuhy Nov 29 '13 at 4:00
2  
Workarounds: 1) SELECT RPAD('甲骨文', 10 - LENGTHC('甲骨文'), '$') FROM DUAL; 2) SELECT SUBSTRB('甲骨文' || RPAD('$', 10, '$'), 1, 10) FROM DUAL; –  eliuhy Nov 29 '13 at 4:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As the request of @jonearles , I copyed my solution on comment section as single answer here to help people to solve this problem.

Hi guys, I've got the reason and workarounds by searching from Google. Here is the explanation from Oracle documentation: "The total length of the return value as it is displayed on your terminal screen. In most character sets, this is also the number of characters in the return value. However, in some multibyte character sets, the display length of a character string can differ from the number of characters in the string." And workarounds depend on the actual display length in your screen (View text in monospaced fonts)

Workarounds

-- 1) 
SELECT RPAD('甲骨文', 10 - LENGTHC('甲骨文'), '$') FROM DUAL; 
-- 2) Recomended!
SELECT SUBSTRB('甲骨文' || RPAD('$', 10, '$'), 1, 10) FROM DUAL;
share|improve this answer

This is Oracle bug. The reason for a bug is: Every $ is one byte but every Chinese character is 3 bytes. When RPAD in this version is working he simply calculates 3 Chinese + 10 $'s = 13 bytes. When he displays 13 bytes - he has to cut some $'s. You welcome to open bug with Oracle.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.