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sold = Array.new

ticketfile.each {|line| 
    a = line.split(",")

    nr2 = Ticket.new(a[0],a[1])
    sold<<nr2

}

This is my array where i have following elements: ticknum and serialnum. It gets these information from a text file.

What i want is to find all duplicates (where ticknum and serialnum are identical) and make a new array where ticknum, serialnum, and amount of duplicates are.

Anyone who can help me with this please?

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closed as off-topic by sawa, legoscia, Praveen, True Soft, Parag Bafna Nov 27 '13 at 14:42

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking for code must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved. Include attempted solutions, why they didn't work, and the expected results. See also: Stack Overflow question checklist" – legoscia, Praveen, True Soft, Parag Bafna
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I'd suggest going with very simple solution:

ticketfile.each_with_object(Hash.new(0)) {|line, hash| 
  hash[line.split(",")] += 1
}

You could define eql? method on your Ticket class to use it as a key in hash (see Which equality test does Ruby's Hash use when comparing keys?)

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I would use Enumerable#group_by:

Emulating your Ticket class:

class Ticket < Struct.new(:ticknum, :serialnum); end
=> nil

Create some tickets:

(This is just emulating your file read into an Array)

tickets = [Ticket.new(1, 2), Ticket.new(1, 2), Ticket.new(1, 3), Ticket.new(1, 4), Ticket.new(1, 4)]
=> [#<struct Ticket ticknum=1, serialnum=2>,
 #<struct Ticket ticknum=1, serialnum=2>,
 #<struct Ticket ticknum=1, serialnum=3>,
 #<struct Ticket ticknum=1, serialnum=4>,
 #<struct Ticket ticknum=1, serialnum=4>]

Here's a group_by:

groups = tickets.group_by { |t| [t.ticknum, t.serialnum] }
=> {[1, 2]=>
  [#<struct Ticket ticknum=1, serialnum=2>,
   #<struct Ticket ticknum=1, serialnum=2>],
 [1, 3]=>[#<struct Ticket ticknum=1, serialnum=3>],
 [1, 4]=>
  [#<struct Ticket ticknum=1, serialnum=4>,
   #<struct Ticket ticknum=1, serialnum=4>]}

Filter out non-duplicates:

duplicates = groups.reject { |k, v| v.length < 2 }
=> {[1, 2]=>
  [#<struct Ticket ticknum=1, serialnum=2>,
   #<struct Ticket ticknum=1, serialnum=2>],
 [1, 4]=>
  [#<struct Ticket ticknum=1, serialnum=4>,
   #<struct Ticket ticknum=1, serialnum=4>]}

Listing the number of times each duplicated Ticket appears:

duplicates.values.each do | group |
  puts "There are #{group.length} of #{group.first}"
end  
There are 2 of #<struct Ticket ticknum=1, serialnum=2>
There are 2 of #<struct Ticket ticknum=1, serialnum=4>
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1  
OP has been answered this before...stackoverflow.com/questions/20203452/… – steenslag Nov 27 '13 at 12:18
    
@steenslag: ☹ Thanks. – Johnsyweb Nov 27 '13 at 12:23

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