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This is a question of best practices. I have a utility that takes in a two digit year as a string and I need to convert it to a four digit year as a string. right now I do

//DOB's format is "MMM (D)D YY" that first digit of the day is not there for numbers 1-9
string tmpYear = rowIn.DOB.Substring(rowIn.DOB.Length - 3, 2); //-3 because it is 0 indexed
if (Convert.ToInt16(tmpYear) > 50)
    tmpYear = String.Format("19{0}", tmpYear);
else
    tmpYear = String.Format("20{0}", tmpYear);

I am sure I am doing it horribly wrong, any pointers?

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11  
I think you should randomly choose between 19-- and 20--. Didn't anyone learn from Y2K not to use 2 digit years? –  Joe Philllips Jan 7 '10 at 22:54
2  
Some customers <strike>have their heads so far up their asses</strike>mandate use of 2-digit years. –  Ian Boyd Jun 20 '10 at 1:46
    
Is there any other date info in the db to help? Age? Last visit to the vet? Latest image? IsAlive? DODeath? Hopefully you can push to have the db updated. –  Jess Aug 19 '10 at 17:51

11 Answers 11

up vote 19 down vote accepted

The .NET framework has a method that does exactly what you want:

int fourDigitYear = System.Threading.Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentCulture.Calendar.ToFourDigitYear(yourTwoDigitYear)

That way you will correctly adhere to current regional settings.

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Are there any regional differences that influence 2 to 4 digit year conversion? –  Tomas Apr 18 '13 at 10:42
    
Legislative I think not, but organisational yes - you can propagate this trough group policy for the whole domain and have your applications tailored to specific needs of an user/organisation. –  Vedran Jul 9 '13 at 14:22
    
Or System.Globalization.CultureInfo.CurrentCulture or CultureInfo.CurrentUICulture or CultureInfo.DefaultThreadCurrentCulture, etc. –  jnm2 Apr 7 '14 at 14:11
3  
I'm running into this on some current code. Using the Thai cultural settings means that a year of 2000, stored as 00, is being interpreted as 3100 in the Buddhist Era, or 3100-543=2557 in the system! Very confusing bug until you realize what's going on. –  Sean Duggan Jul 17 '14 at 20:02

Given that there are people alive now born before 1950, but none born after 2010, your use of 50 as the flipping point seems broken.

For date of birth, can you not set the flip point to the 'year of now' (i.e. 10) in your app? Even then you'll have problems with those born before 1911...

There's no perfect way to do this - you're creating information out of thin air.

I've assumed DOB = date-of-birth. For other data (say, maturity of a financial instrument) the choice might be different, but just as imperfect.

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You are right about the DOB, but they are for animals not humans, and their lifespan is at most 40 years. but you are right about using a moving target. I will now use if (Convert.ToInt16(String.Format("20{0}", tmpYear[2])) > DateTime.Today.Year + 3) // Causes Y2.1K problem, but I will be retired by then. –  Scott Chamberlain Jan 8 '10 at 14:44
    
Like an animal Logan's Run eh? With a moving threshold year, and given no 100year+ lifespans, you should be ok. I assumed humans obviously. You could address the Y2K1 issue by making the Century part derive from Today too... –  martin clayton Jan 9 '10 at 0:06
    
@drogon I'm glad my life doesn't depend on your code. Thanks for the downvote. –  martin clayton Jun 14 '13 at 18:33
    
@martin - I'm glad you've decided to post an answer filled with meandering and no real solution. Also, I'm glad someone marked it as the answer when the one below it is the solution. –  drogon Jun 14 '13 at 18:55

Once you've taken the other suggestions as to when to flip your century assumptions from 19 to 20, the best of all possible worlds involves updating your data source once and for all with 4-digit years, so you can stop making assumptions all the time.

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Unfortunately I have no control over the data source. –  Scott Chamberlain Jan 8 '10 at 14:12

I think Java has a good implementation of this:

http://java.sun.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/text/SimpleDateFormat.html#year

People rarely specify years far into the future using a two-digit code. The Java implementation handles this by assuming a range of 80 years behind and 20 years ahead of the current year. So right now, 30 would be 2030, while 31 would be 1931. Additionally, this implementation is flexible, modifying its ranges as time goes on, so that you don't have to change the code every decade or so.

I just tested, and Excel also uses these same rules for 2-digit year conversion. 1/1/29 turns into 1/1/2029. 1/1/30 turns into 1/1/1930.

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It might be smarter to check tmpYear > currentYear%100. If it is, then it's 19XX, otherwise 20XX.

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You can also use the DateTime.TryParse method to convert your date. It uses the current culture settings to define the pivot year (in my case it is 2029)

DateTime resultDate;
Console.WriteLine("CultureInfo.CurrentCulture.Calendar.TwoDigitYearMax : {0}", System.Globalization.CultureInfo.CurrentCulture.Calendar.TwoDigitYearMax);
DateTime.TryParse("01/01/28", out resultDate);
Console.WriteLine("Generated date with year=28 - {0}",resultDate);
DateTime.TryParse("01/02/29",out resultDate);
Console.WriteLine("Generated date with year=29 - {0}", resultDate);
DateTime.TryParse("01/03/30", out resultDate);
Console.WriteLine("Generated date with year=30 - {0}", resultDate);

The output is:

CultureInfo.CurrentCulture.Calendar.TwoDigitYearMax : 2029

Generated date with year=28 - 01/01/2028 00:00:00

Generated date with year=29 - 01/02/2029 00:00:00

Generated date with year=30 - 01/03/1930 00:00:00

If you want to change the behavior you can create a culture with the year you want to use as pivot. This thread shows an example

DateTime.TryParse century control C#

But as martin stated, if you want to manage a time period that spans more than 100 year, there is no way to do it with only 2 digits.

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1  
FYI the TwoDigitYearMax is set in the control panel. Under Regional and Language options. –  Ray Nov 8 '11 at 17:33
    
@Ray : Thanks for the update. Didn't know. –  FrenchData Nov 11 '11 at 10:41

The implementation of

System.Globalization.CultureInfo.CurrentCulture.Calendar.ToFourDigitYear 

is

public virtual int ToFourDigitYear(int year)
{
  if (year < 0)
    throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("year", Environment.GetResourceString("ArgumentOutOfRange_NeedNonNegNum"));
  if (year < 100)
    return (this.TwoDigitYearMax / 100 - (year > this.TwoDigitYearMax % 100 ? 1 : 0)) * 100 + year;
  else
    return year;
}

Hope this helps!

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Try this simple code

//Invoke TextBoxDateFormat method with date as parameter.

Method

public void TextBoxDateFormat(string str1)

{

// Takes the current date format if MM/DD/YY or MM/DD/YYYY

DateTime dt = Convert.ToDateTime(str1);

//Converts the requested date into MM/DD/YYYY and assign it to textbox field

TextBox = String.Format("{0:MM/dd/yyyy}", dt.ToShortDateString());


//include your validation code if required

}
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Out of curiosity, from where do you get this data? From a form? In that case; I would simply ask the user to fill in (or somehow select) the year with four digits or get the users age and month/day of birth, and use that data to figure out what year they were born. That way, you wouldn't have to worry about this problem at all :)

Edit: Use DateTime for working with this kind of data.

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1  
If you ask a dog for the year it was born, you don't want to wait until it barks all the way up to 2003! 3 quick yaps is more efficient... –  AdamV Sep 22 '11 at 23:06

Had a similar issue, and came up with this... HTH!

value = this.GetDate()

if (value.Length >= 6)//ensure that the date is mmddyy
{
    int year = 0;

    if (int.TryParse(value.Substring(4, 2), out year))
    {
        int pastMillenium = int.Parse(DateTime.Now.ToString("yyyy").Substring(0, 2)) - 1;

        if (year > int.Parse(DateTime.Now.ToString("yy")))//if its a future year it's most likely 19XX
        {
            value = string.Format("{0}{1}{2}", value.Substring(0, 4), pastMillenium, year.ToString().PadLeft(2, '0'));
        }
        else
        {
            value = string.Format("{0}{1}{2}", value.Substring(0, 4), pastMillenium + 1, year.ToString().PadLeft(2, '0'));
        }
    }
    else
    {
        value = string.Empty;
    }
}
else
{
    value = string.Empty;
}
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My answer will not match your question but for credit cards I just add 2 digits of current year

    private int UpconvertTwoDigitYearToFour(int yearTwoOrFour)
    {
        try
        {
            if (yearTwoOrFour.ToString().Length <= 2)
            {
                DateTime yearOnly = DateTime.ParseExact(yearTwoOrFour.ToString("D2"), "yy", null);
                return yearOnly.Year;
            }
        }
        catch
        {
        }

        return yearTwoOrFour;
    }
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