Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have been reading Mark Seeman's book on dependency injection in .NET and I'm struggling to configure composition root in WPF application.

My container will be registered in the application startup method:

protected override void OnStartup(StartupEventArgs e)
{
    base.OnStartup(e);

    var container = new Container();
    container.Configure(r =>
                        {
                            r.For<IAccountServices>().Use<AccountServicesProxy>();
                            r.For<MainWindow>().Use<MainWindow>();
                        });
}

This makes sense as the application startup represents my composition root.

WPF windows in my application are based on view models. View models use constructor injection. E.g. I may compose a view model by injecting implementation of IAccountServices.

When it comes to creating my main window, I can do the following inside of the OnStartup method:

var mainWindow = container.GetInstance<MainWindow>();
mainWindow.Show();

Once I'm inside of the main window, I might want open up another window. So far I've been able to come up with one way of doing this, which is to create a window factory and ask window factory to resolve instance of the window. I'll have to make sure that window factory is available in every view model that might need to open a new window. In my mind this is as bad as passing IoC container around my application (service locator anti-pattern comes to mind).

Does this approach seem right to you? My gut feeling tells me that this is wrong, but I haven't come up with a better way of achieving this (yet).

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers 3

I think before implement patterns of behavior, such as a Mediator, and the like, need to decide on a generic pattern for easy application structure. For this purpose, namely, for the create independent windows, well suited Abstract factory pattern.

Creation of the windows can be implemented on the side ViewModel using methods such as IDialogService. But I think that this task should be implemented on the side View, because the Window object refers to the View and not to ViewModel. So, you must create MVVM style architecture that it allows create independent windows using design patterns.

I created a project in which an Abstract factory creates a Window on the side of the View using the attached behavior. Abstract factory also implements the Singleton pattern to create a global point of access and to ensure the uniqueness of the newly constructed object. Attached behavior implicitly implements pattern Decorator who is a wrapper for an abstract factory that is used on the side of XAML. To an Abstract factory does not refer to objects which are located in ViewModel is used a Proxy pattern which is a ContentControl with DataTemplate without DataType. Also used Command pattern for independent action between objects. As a result, this project uses the following patterns:

  • Abstract factory
  • Singleton
  • Decorator
  • Proxy
  • Command

The project structure looks like this:

enter image description here

In the attached behavior has attached dependency property Name, which is transmitted in the name of the new window. For him registered PropertyChangedEvent, which is a call Make method an abstract factory:

private static void IsFactoryStart(DependencyObject sender, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
{
    var window = sender as Window;

    if (window == null)
    {
        return;
    }

    if (e.NewValue is String && String.IsNullOrEmpty((string)e.NewValue) == false)
    {
        _typeWindow = (string)e.NewValue;

        if (_typeWindow != null)
        {
            var newWindow = WindowFactory.Instance.Make(_typeWindow);
            newWindow.Show();
        }        
    }
}

WindowFactory together with the Singleton pattern looks like this:

public class WindowFactory : IWindowFactory
{
    #region WindowFactory Singleton Instance

    private static WindowFactory _instance = null;
    private static readonly object padlock = new object();

    public static WindowFactory Instance
    {
        get
        {
            lock (padlock)
            {
                if (_instance == null)
                {
                    _instance = new WindowFactory();
                }

                return _instance;
            }
        }
    }

    #endregion

    public Window Make(string TypeWindow)
    {
        if (TypeWindow.Equals("WindowOneViewProxy"))
        {
            var windowOne = new Window();                

            windowOne.Width = 450;
            windowOne.Height = 250;
            windowOne.WindowStartupLocation = WindowStartupLocation.CenterScreen;
            windowOne.Title = TypeWindow;
            windowOne.ContentTemplate = Application.Current.Resources[TypeWindow] as DataTemplate;

            return windowOne;
        }
        else if (TypeWindow.Equals("WindowTwoViewProxy"))
        {
            var windowTwo = new Window();
            windowTwo.Width = 500;
            windowTwo.Height = 200;
            windowTwo.WindowStartupLocation = WindowStartupLocation.CenterScreen;
            windowTwo.Title = TypeWindow;
            windowTwo.ContentTemplate = Application.Current.Resources[TypeWindow] as DataTemplate;

            return windowTwo;
        }
        else if (TypeWindow.Equals("WindowThreeViewProxy")) 
        {
            var windowThree = new Window();
            windowThree.Width = 400;
            windowThree.Height = 140;
            windowThree.WindowStartupLocation = WindowStartupLocation.CenterScreen;
            windowThree.Title = TypeWindow;
            windowThree.ContentTemplate = Application.Current.Resources[TypeWindow] as DataTemplate;

            return windowThree;
        }
        else
            throw new Exception("Factory can not create a: {0}" + TypeWindow);
    }
}

For the property Window.ContentTemplate set DataTemplate from resources. ContentTemplate is responsible for the visual representation, in order to bind properties from ViewModel, you need to set the object to Content. But in this case, the Abstract factory reference will to ViewModel, and to avoid them and using the proxy pattern as follows:

WindowOneProxyView

<DataTemplate x:Key="WindowOneViewProxy">
    <ContentControl ContentTemplate="{StaticResource WindowOneViewRealObject}">
        <ViewModels:WindowOneViewModel />
    </ContentControl>
</DataTemplate>

WindowOneViewRealObject

<DataTemplate x:Key="WindowOneViewRealObject" DataType="{x:Type ViewModels:WindowOneViewModel}">
    <Grid>
        <Label Content="{Binding Path=WindowOneModel.TextContent}" 
               HorizontalAlignment="Center"
               VerticalAlignment="Top"
               HorizontalContentAlignment="Center"
               VerticalContentAlignment="Center"
               Background="Beige" />

        <Button Content="One command" 
                Width="100"
                Height="30"
                HorizontalAlignment="Center"
                Command="{Binding OneCommand}" />
    </Grid>
</DataTemplate>

In DataTemplate proxy is not specified DataType, but it is in the real object.

In MainViewModel has commands to simply set the window name, which will give input for attached behavior:

MainModel

public class MainModel : NotificationObject
{
    #region TypeName

    private string _typeName = null;

    public string TypeName
    {
        get
        {
            return _typeName;
        }

        set
        {
            _typeName = value;
            NotifyPropertyChanged("TypeName");
        }
    }

    #endregion
}

MainViewModel

public class MainViewModel
{
    #region MainModel

    private MainModel _mainModel = null;

    public MainModel MainModel
    {
        get
        {
            return _mainModel;
        }

        set
        {
            _mainModel = value;
        }
    }

    #endregion

    #region ShowWindowOneCommand

    private ICommand _showWindowOneCommand = null;

    public ICommand ShowWindowOneCommand
    {
        get
        {
            if (_showWindowOneCommand == null)
            {
                _showWindowOneCommand = new RelayCommand(param => this.ShowWindowOne(), null);
            }

            return _showWindowOneCommand;
        }
    }

    private void ShowWindowOne()
    {
        MainModel.TypeName = "WindowOneViewProxy";
    }

    #endregion

    #region ShowWindowTwoCommand

    private ICommand _showWindowTwoCommand = null;

    public ICommand ShowWindowTwoCommand
    {
        get
        {
            if (_showWindowTwoCommand == null)
            {
                _showWindowTwoCommand = new RelayCommand(param => this.ShowWindowTwo(), null);
            }

            return _showWindowTwoCommand;
        }
    }

    private void ShowWindowTwo()
    {
        MainModel.TypeName = "WindowTwoViewProxy";
    }

    #endregion

    #region ShowWindowThreeCommand

    private ICommand _showWindowThreeCommand = null;

    public ICommand ShowWindowThreeCommand
    {
        get
        {
            if (_showWindowThreeCommand == null)
            {
                _showWindowThreeCommand = new RelayCommand(param => this.ShowWindowThree(), null);
            }

            return _showWindowThreeCommand;
        }
    }

    private void ShowWindowThree()
    {
        MainModel.TypeName = "WindowThreeViewProxy";
    }

    #endregion

    public MainViewModel() 
    {
        MainModel = new MainModel();
    }
}

MainWindow looks as:

<Window x:Class="WindowFactoryNamespace.MainWindow"
        xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
        xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
        xmlns:this="clr-namespace:WindowFactoryNamespace.ViewModels"
        xmlns:AttachedBehaviors="clr-namespace:WindowFactoryNamespace.AttachedBehaviors"
        AttachedBehaviors:WindowFactoryBehavior.Name="{Binding Path=MainModel.TypeName}"
        WindowStartupLocation="CenterScreen"
        Title="MainWindow" Height="300" Width="300"> 

<Window.DataContext>
    <this:MainViewModel />
</Window.DataContext>

<WrapPanel>
    <Button Content="WindowOne"
            Margin="10"
            Command="{Binding ShowWindowOneCommand}" /> 

    <Button Content="WindowTwo"
            Margin="10"
            Command="{Binding ShowWindowTwoCommand}" />

    <Button Content="WindowThree"
            Margin="10"
            Command="{Binding ShowWindowThreeCommand}" />
    </WrapPanel>
</Window>

Test View-ViewModel for the first window looks like this (they practically identical):

WindowOneModel

public class WindowOneModel : NotificationObject
{
    #region TextContent

    private string _textContent = "Text content for WindowOneView";

    public string TextContent
    {
        get
        {
            return _textContent;
        }

        set
        {
            _textContent = value;
            NotifyPropertyChanged("TextContent");
        }
    }

    #endregion
}

WindowOneViewModel

public class WindowOneViewModel
{
    #region WindowOneModel

    private WindowOneModel _windowOneModel = null;

    public WindowOneModel WindowOneModel
    {
        get
        {
            return _windowOneModel;
        }

        set
        {
            _windowOneModel = value;
        }
    }

    #endregion

    #region OneCommand

    private ICommand _oneCommand = null;

    public ICommand OneCommand
    {
        get
        {
            if (_oneCommand == null)
            {
                _oneCommand = new RelayCommand(param => this.One(), null);
            }

            return _oneCommand;
        }
    }

    private void One()
    {
         WindowOneModel.TextContent = "Command One change TextContent";
    }

    #endregion

    public WindowOneViewModel() 
    {
        WindowOneModel = new WindowOneModel();
    }
}

This project is available at this link.

Output

MainWindow

enter image description here

WindowOne

enter image description here

WindowTwo

enter image description here

WindowThree

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
how the parent view model get information back from a closed window? For example whether the user clicked ok or cancel button in a window? –  Jimmy Feb 17 at 16:25
    
@Jimmy: There are several variants. In this case, I would add in MainViewModel IsWindowOneClosed property, and using the Mediator pattern would send a signal from WindowOneView. Here you can see my example that uses the Mediator pattern. –  Anatoliy Nikolaev Feb 17 at 16:51
    
Hey, thank you for such a detailed post. It's a nice solution. So far I've been using a less friendly approach where I open windows through PRISM messages. For example, I'd dispatch a message that will contain relevant information along with a caller. The only problem with your approach is that I won't be able to pass data to new window like I could with messages. –  user338195 Feb 17 at 23:09
add comment

IMHO, there is no need to over complicate the solution for the sake of MVVM purity. You risk the subsequent developers not understanding your elegant solution and break it. In fact there is a good chance of that as "pure" implementations tend to be not that readable because of the complexity.

IMHO, any solution where a problem is permanently solved under an abstraction with minimal code overhead and simplicity in its usage is better than doing considerable overhead every time the solution is used even if "purity" is achieved(it won't serve any purpose). The problem of showing dialog in the application has to be solved once and it should be easy to use it in the future.

Composing view models is perfectly fine, and could make life easier by allowing view models to interact without drama

A dialog service can be created which will act as a wrapper for all your dialog needs in the application. You can inject the Dialog Service and the child view models which needs to be displayed in a window, to your parent view model. When you need to display the window, ask the Dialog service to do it, passing it the view model instance and view name.

Note:code is not complied or tested

 public class DialogService : IDialogService
{

 IEventAggregator _eventAggregator;
 bool _fatalError;

//Provides a wrapper function which will connect your view and view model and open a     
//dialog
 public Window ShowCustomDialog<TViewModel>(string name, TViewModel viewModel, bool 
      modal, double left, double top, Action<bool?> OnClose, int width, int height)
  {
            if (_fatalError == true)
            {
                return null;
            }

            Window view = new Window(name);           

            if (viewModel != null)
            {
                view.DataContext = viewModel;
            }

            if (left != -1.0 && top != -1.0)
            {
                view.WindowStartupLocation = WindowStartupLocation.Manual;
                view.Left = left;
                view.Top = top;
            }
            else
            {
                view.WindowStartupLocation = WindowStartupLocation.CenterScreen;
            }

            if (width != -1 && height != -1)
            {
                view.Width = width;
                view.Height = height;
            }

            view.Closed += (o, e) =>
                {
                    _eventAggregator.GetEvent<NotifyDialogAction>().Publish(false);

                    if (OnClose != null)
                    {
                        OnClose(e.DialogResult);
                    }
                };


            view.Loaded += (o, e) =>
                {
                    _eventAggregator.GetEvent<NotifyDialogAction>().Publish(true);

                    Window window = o as Window;
                    if (window != null)
                    {
                        double dialogWidth = window.ActualWidth;
                        double screenWidth = 
                             Application.Current.RootVisual.RenderSize.Width;
                        double dialogLeft = window.Left;

                        if (dialogLeft + dialogWidth > screenWidth)
                        {
                            window.Left = screenWidth - dialogWidth;
                        }

                        double dialogHeight = window.ActualHeight;
                        double screenHeight = 
                            Application.Current.RootVisual.RenderSize.Height;
                        double dialogTop = window.Top;

                        if (dialogTop + dialogHeight > screenHeight)
                        {
                            window.Top = screenHeight - dialogHeight;
                        }

                    }
                };

            if (modal)
            {
                view.ShowDialog();
            }
            else
            {
                view.Show();
            }

            return view;
        }

//Add more functions. For example to pop up a message box etc.
}

Usage

 public class ComposedVM
   {
       public ViewModelA objA{get;set;}
       public ViewModelB objB{get;set;}
       IDialogService dialogService{get;set;}

       public ComposedVM(ViewModelA  a, ViewModelB b, IDialogService dlg )
       {
         objA = a;
         objB = b;
         dialogService = dlg

        }


      public void OnShowWindowACommand()
      {
         dialogService .ShowCustomDialog<object>(
         DialogNames.ViewA/*view name constant*/, objA, true, -1.0, -1.0,
         result =>
         {
            if (result == true)
            {                                                                         
               dialogService.ShowMessageDialog(ApplicationStrings.SuccessFulOperation);                           
            }
          });

        }
    }

An event/message based communication can be used between modules. Using it for related view models in a module is an overkill IMHO.

share|improve this answer
    
Maybe I'm wrong, in my example where you have seen the difficulty? This is the standard way to work with MVVM through DataTemplate. The only thing added - is an abstract factory that creates a window on the condition. This factory is realized through an attached behavior, which is commonly used in MVVM. About the factory, this is probably the easiest pattern of 28, I know. Besides patterns created that others understand your solution without problem, which was created under the standard. –  Anatoliy Nikolaev Feb 18 at 11:23
    
If you have not downloaded my example, I advise you to do it. The code is very simple and clear, without any hacks and additional frameworks. –  Anatoliy Nikolaev Feb 18 at 11:27
    
@AnatoliyNikolaev, I did download your solution and had a look at it.I appreciate you managed to make the view models independent. By doing this it became impossible for view model to talk to its child view models through natural interfaces,instead it has use an event/message based communication. The application could end up with 100s of event definition, for communicating between view models, and communicating between modules(if any) whereas only in the latter case it is strictly necessary. There is no clear advantage unless your Windows itself are pretty complex. –  Jimmy Feb 18 at 12:03
1  
Another point I want to make is by using the mediator/factory pattern, the problem of showing dialogs in the application became a recurring problem. Every time you need to create a viewmodel/view for the purpose of using inside a dialog you have to use boilerplate code to manage the "independence". This is bad IMHO. –  Jimmy Feb 18 at 12:15
add comment

Pushing container instance through constructor is a bad idea in 99% of cases, because container is a service locator. The main disadvantages of this approach are:

  • dependency from concrete implementation of container;
  • unclear API of your classes, which also leads to fragile unit tests.

There are many ways to create window in MVVM fashion:

  1. using Mediators (like IMessenger in MvvmLight, IEventAggregator in Caliburn.Micro);
  2. using special IDialogService;
  3. using attached behaviours;
  4. using Action that inserted via ViewModel constructor;
  5. using Controllers.
share|improve this answer
    
Initially I've used messaging solution, but it's now becoming very difficult to maintain as we have in a region of ten windows. There are multiple exit points from a single window, so I have messages on the lines of GoToHomeScreenMessage, StartNewProcessXMessage, StartNewProcessYMessage etc. –  user338195 Feb 12 at 16:34
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.