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This question already has an answer here:

Pretty basic question in C#,

class Data<T>
 {
    T obj;

    public Data()
    {
      // Allocate to obj from T here
      // Some Activator.CreateInstance() method ?
      obj =  ???
    }
 }

How do i do this?

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marked as duplicate by nawfal, Fox32, ShadowScripter, Signare, quetzalcoatl Apr 26 '13 at 10:09

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
A follow up for someone who is interested in this.This is a major difference between C# Generics and C++ templates, we have to impose constraints on types for the compiler to recognize any properties of the type. Please read this msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… – fadini Jan 10 '10 at 20:38
up vote 19 down vote accepted

If you want to create your own instance of T, then you need define a constraint new()

class Data<T> where T: new()
 {
    T obj;

    public Data()
    {
      obj =  new T();
    }
 }

If you want to pass in the obj then you need to allow it in the constructor

 class Data<T>
     {
        T obj;

        public Data(T val)
        {
          obj = val;
        }
     }
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Answer is exactly what I was looking for too! Thanks! – deanvmc Jan 7 '10 at 23:24

YOU can use the new constraint in your generic class definition to ensure T has a default constructor you can call. Constraints allow you to inform the compiler about certain behaviors (capabilities) that the generic parameter T must adhere to.

class Data<T> where T : new()
{
    T obj;

    public Data()
    {
        obj = new T();
    }
}
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