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How this enum is assigned? What are all the value for each?

public enum SiteRoles
{
    User = 1 << 0,
    Admin = 1 << 1,
    Helpdesk = 1 << 2
}

What is the use of assigning like this?

Used in this post

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Because the answers already explain it in better detail I leave this as a comment: 1 << X is the same thing as doing 2^X in math (where ^ is the power symbol not the XOR symbol) so you are assigning the values 2^0, 2^1, 2^2 –  Scott Chamberlain Nov 27 '13 at 14:30
    
Often used in conjunction with [Flags] attribute, relevant stackoverflow.com/q/8447/841176 –  kostyan Nov 27 '13 at 14:32
    
More generally X << Y is equivalent to X * Math.Pow(2,Y). This is extremely useful for creating large powers of 2 numbers. Say you wanted to create a 4K byte array for a buffer it would just be new byte[4 << 10] ( x << 10 is K, x << 20 is M, x << 30 is G) –  Scott Chamberlain Nov 27 '13 at 14:45

1 Answer 1

They're making a bit flag. Instead of writing the values as 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, etc., they left shift the 1 value to multiply it by 2. One could argue that it's easier to read.

It allows bitwise operations on the enum value.

1 << 0 = 1 (binary 0001)
1 << 1 = 2 (binary 0010)
1 << 2 = 4 (binary 0100)
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bitshift operator how do i understand this? I dont know how to read this statement User = 1 << 0 and use it –  Billa Nov 27 '13 at 14:27
    
LOL - it could certainly be easier to count if there are large enumerations. That's a neat trick, @Billa. I'll have to remember that one. –  jp2code Nov 27 '13 at 14:27
    
@Billa See MSDN reference on the << operator msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/vstudio/a1sway8w.aspx Basically it shifts the binary representation of the number. binary 1 becomes binary 10. –  Vache Nov 27 '13 at 14:28
2  
One could argue that it's easier to read .. one could also argue that it wasn't :) –  Jens Kloster Nov 27 '13 at 14:29
3  
@JensKloster For sure, that's why I didn't go straight for a "it's easier to read" haha –  Vache Nov 27 '13 at 14:30

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