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I'm trying to copy x bytes. The size is counted and printed out(see below). I use memcpy to copy the counted amount of bytes. But as result I'm getting sometimes longer values. What is wrong?

This is a few of the code:

  size_t  symlen  = tmpP - cp;
  char * triP = malloc(symlen);
  printf("mallocated %zu\n", symlen) ;
  memcpy (triP, tmpP - (symlen) , symlen);
  printf(">>VAL %s<<\n", triP);

Here is some output and you can see, that value is longer as 15 characters.

mallocated 15
>>VAL 558657,1033,8144399,814<<
mallocated 15
>>VAL 558657,1033,8144399,814<<
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1  
Does symlen account for the trailing \0 character required by printf? Is there a trailing \0? – Dirk Nov 27 '13 at 14:42
1  
Printing as %s assumes this is a zero-terminated string. If this is all you wrote, you forgot to (manually!) add the terminating zero. – Rad Lexus Nov 27 '13 at 14:42
1  
What is the type of tmpP, cp ??? memcpy takes dst and src pointers and no of bytes to be copied, What is th second parameter you are sending to memcpy? It may be the case that you are reading junk data – Deepthought Nov 27 '13 at 14:47
    
I haven't showed tmpP nor cp , because it IMHO was not necessary for finding the error. – MaMu Nov 27 '13 at 14:54
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You should allocate one more byte, and write a null character in it to mark the end of the string.

size_t  symlen  = tmpP - cp;
char * triP = malloc(symlen+1);
printf("mallocated %zu\n", symlen) ;
memcpy (triP, tmpP - (symlen) , symlen);
tripP[symlen] = '\0';
printf(">>VAL %s<<\n", triP);
share|improve this answer

That's because you haven't added the null byte to the memcpy'd data. It looks like memcpy must've marked the page where it copied the string as copy-on-write, so when one accesses triP, one is actually accessing tmpP and thus the value of triP shown in the second printf is tmpP instead of gibberish data.

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