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I need to print a List of Lists using Scala and the function toString, where every occurrence of 0 needs to be replaced by an '_'. This is my attempt so far. The commented code represents my different attempts.

override def toString() = {

    // grid.map(i => if(i == 0) '_' else i)
    // grid map{case 0 => '_' case a => a}
    // grid.updated(0, "_")
    //grid.map{ case 0 => "_"; case x => x}  
    grid.map(_.mkString(" ")).mkString("\n")  

 }

My output should look something like this, but an underscore instead of the zeros

0 0 5 0 0 6 3 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0
9 8 0 7 4 0 0 0 5
1 0 0 0 7 0 9 0 0
0 0 9 5 0 1 6 0 0
0 0 8 0 2 0 0 0 7
6 0 0 0 1 8 0 9 3
0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

Thanks in advance.

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A List[List[Int]], or something else? –  Ed Staub Nov 27 '13 at 14:57
    
List[List[Int]] –  user2899645 Nov 27 '13 at 15:02
    
I edited my question. –  user2899645 Nov 27 '13 at 15:08

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Although the other solutions are functionally correct, I believe this shows more explicitly what happens and as such is better suited for a beginner:

def gridToString(grid: List[List[Int]]): String = {

  def replaceZero(i: Int): Char =
    if (i == 0) '_'
    else i.toString charAt 0

  val lines = grid map { line =>
    line map replaceZero mkString " "
  }

  lines mkString "\n"
}

First we define a method for converting the digit into a character, replacing zeroes with underscores. (It is assumed from your example that all the Int elements are < 10.)

The we take each line of the grid, run each of the digits in that line through our conversion method and assemble the resulting chars into a string.

Than we take we take the resulting line-strings and turn them into the final string.

The whole thing could be written shorter, but it wouldn't necessarily be more readable.

It is also good Scala style to use small inner methods like replaceZero in this example instead of writing all code inline, as the naming of a method helps indicating what it is does, and as such enhances readability.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot for your explanation. Is it possible to explain this part please: i.toString charAt 0 –  user2899645 Nov 27 '13 at 16:23
    
toString simple turns e.g. 5 into a string "5". (Note double marks.) We could use that and it would work just the same, but it's a little bit more elegant to use Char here, since all elements will be represented as single characters, e.g. '5' (note single marks). charAt is a method on the String class. You can look up the API here docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api to see what it does –  Knut Arne Vedaa Nov 27 '13 at 16:30

Just put an extra map in there to change 0 to _

grid.map(_.map(_ match {case 0 => "_"; case x => x}).mkString(" ")).mkString("\n")
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot, it worked :) –  user2899645 Nov 27 '13 at 15:14
    
Is it possible to explain what's happening in this part: .map( match {case 0 => "_"; case x => x} –  user2899645 Nov 27 '13 at 15:19
    
For each item in the List[Int] you are pattern matching against the integer literal 0. When it matches you map that entry to the string "_". For all other values (those that match the placeholder x) just map those to their original values. –  Matt Malone Nov 27 '13 at 15:22
2  
It would be more concise to use .map{ case 0 => "_"; case x => x } (omit the _ match part) –  Dylan Nov 27 '13 at 15:34
    
Thanks, it looks more clean –  user2899645 Nov 27 '13 at 15:50

Nothing special:

def toString(xs: List[List[Int]]) = xs.map { ys => 
    ys.map { 
        case 0 => "_"
        case x => String.valueOf(x)
    }.mkString(" ")
}.mkString("\n")
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1  
x.toString looks nicer in my opinion –  sschaef Nov 27 '13 at 16:10

There's always room for another solution. ;-)

A grid:

type Grid[T] = List[List[T]]

Print a grid:

def print[T](grid: Grid[T]) = grid map(_ mkString " ") mkString "\n"

Replace all zeroes:

for (row <- grid) yield row.collect {
    case 0 => "_"
    case anything => anything
}
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