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I have a situation like so...

class Outer(object):

    def some_method(self):
        # do something

    class Inner(object):
        def __init__(self):
            self.Outer.some_method()    # <-- this is the line in question

How can I access the Outer class's method from the Inner class?

Edit -- Thanks for the responses. I'm concluding that I need to re-assess how I had designed this to be implemented and come up with a more robust method.

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Why are you doing this? What's wrong with simple peer relationships? Are you trying to "conceal" something? –  S.Lott Jan 8 '10 at 0:15

6 Answers 6

up vote 14 down vote accepted

The methods of a nested class cannot directly access the instance attributes of the outer class.

Note that it is not necessarily the case that an instance of the outer class exists even when you have created an instance of the inner class.

In fact, it is often recommended against using nested classes, since the nesting does not imply any particular relationship between the inner and outer classes.

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Hmm, Python is friskier than Java/C++... see my answer below. If we're splitting hairs, which we usually are, I couldn't really tell you whether my "nested class within method" counts as an inner class. At this point, though, I have to invoke duck typing: if it does everything an inner class could possibly do... from a Pythonic point of view it's probably time to get bored with splitting hairs –  mike rodent Nov 7 '11 at 14:40
    
An inner class of course does imply a relationship with the outer class, typically having to do with the implied usage scope of the inner class or otherwise an organizational namespace. –  A-B-B Apr 7 at 19:37

You're trying to access Outer's class instance, from inner class instance. So just use factory-method to build Inner instance and pass Outer instance to it.

class Outer(object):

    def createInner(self):
        return Outer.Inner(self)

    class Inner(object):
        def __init__(self, outer_instance):
            self.outer_instance = outer_instance
            self.outer_instance.somemethod()

        def inner_method(self):
            self.outer_instance.anothermethod()
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Do you mean to use inheritance, rather than nesting classes like this? What you're doing doesn't make a heap of sense in Python.

You can access the Outer's some_method by just referencing Outer.some_method within the inner class's methods, but it's not going to work as you expect it will. For example, if you try this:

class Outer(object):

    def some_method(self):
        # do something

    class Inner(object):
        def __init__(self):
            Outer.some_method()

...you'll get a TypeError when initialising an Inner object, because Outer.some_method expects to receive an Outer instance as its first argument. (In the example above, you're basically trying to call some_method as a class method of Outer.)

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The reason why it probably doesn't make sense is because I'm being intentionally hacky. Adding custom methods to a QuerySet in Django requires a bit of boilerplate code, and I was attempting to derive a clever way to do it using python that allowed me to template the boilerplate code and simply write the pertinent parts in my Model code. –  T. Stone Jan 8 '10 at 0:05
    
Apologies -- I don't know Django and so can't suggest a way to template the boilerplate code, but you may be barking up the wrong tree in trying to nest your classes. Your Inner class doesn't acquire anything from your Outer class. All nesting it within Outer does is force you to access it via Outer.Inner, rather than just plain Inner. –  zenbot Jan 8 '10 at 0:18

maybe I'm mad but this seems very easy indeed - the thing is to make your inner class inside a method of the outer class...

def do_sthg( self ):
    ...

def messAround( self ):

    outerClassSelf = self

    class mooble():
        def do_sthg_different( self ):
            ...
            outerClassSelf.do_sthg()

Plus... "self" is only used by convention, so you could do this:

def do_sthg( self ):
    ...

def messAround( outerClassSelf ):

    class mooble():
        def do_sthg_different( self ):
            ...
            outerClassSelf.do_sthg()

It might be objected that you can't then create this inner class from outside the outer class... but this ain't true:

class Bumblebee():

    def do_sthg( self ):
        print "sthg"

    def giveMeAnInnerClass( outerClassSelf ):

        class mooble():
            def do_sthg_different( self ):
                print "something diff\n"
                outerClassSelf.do_sthg()
        return mooble

then, somewhere miles away:

blob = Bumblebee().giveMeAnInnerClass()()
blob.do_sthg_different()    

even push the boat out a bit and extend this inner class (NB to get super() to work you have to change the class signature of mooble to "class mooble( object )"

class InnerBumblebeeWithAddedBounce( Bumblebee().giveMeAnInnerClass() ):
    def bounce( self ):
        print "bounce"

    def do_sthg_different( self ):
        super( InnerBumblebeeWithAddedBounce, self ).do_sthg_different()
        print "and more different"


ibwab = InnerBumblebeeWithAddedBounce()    
ibwab.bounce()
ibwab.do_sthg_different()
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This works for me. What is this construct called exactly? A factory function? A closure? –  nakedfanatic Sep 6 '11 at 5:37
    
I haven't got a clue what it's called... but might I suggest that the reason why the other posters didn't see this is because it was perhaps not fully appreciated that most things in Python are non-sacred, including "self" (arbitrary name) and classes - they are "first class objects", which seems to mean you can manipulate them in quite outrageous ways –  mike rodent Sep 29 '11 at 17:38

i found this.

Tweaked to suite your question, it is the answer:

class Outer(object):
    def some_method(self):
        # do something

    class _Inner(object):
        def __init__(self, outer):
            outer.some_method()
    def Inner(self):
        return Inner(self)

I’m sure you can somehow write a decorator for this or something :)
/edit: kinda

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Another possibility:

class _Outer (object):
    # Define your static methods here, e.g.
    @staticmethod
    def subclassRef ():
        return Outer

class Outer (_Outer):
    class Inner (object):
        def outer (self):
            return _Outer

        def doSomething (self):
            outer = self.outer ()
            # Call your static mehthods.
            cls = outer.subclassRef ()
            return cls ()
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