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I have 2 questions regarding the following code snippet:

public class Provider
{
    private static Provider _instance;

    /* Internals ommited. */

    public static Provider Instance
    {
        get { return _instance ?? (_instance = new Provider()); }
    }
}

public class Consumer
{
    private readonly Provider _dependency;

    public Consumer()
        : this(Provider.Instance)
    {
    }

    public Consumer(Provider dependency)
    {
        _dependency = dependency;
    }

    /* Internals ommited. */
}

1) The second constructor uses the dependency injection pattern, what is the first one doing? Service location?

2) Is it common practice to provide such an overloaded ctor which uses a default instance? Or are there better ways to do something like this? (I would like to avoid implementing a wrapper class).

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It's a singleton. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Singleton_pattern –  kenny Nov 27 '13 at 15:23
    
@kenny, Provider has a reference to a single instance but is not a complete singleton. The Provider should define its default constructor as private, otherwise anyone could create a Provider instance just by saying new Provider(). Besides, The default constructor of the Consumer uses the single instance defined in Provider, but it doesn't mean all the Consumer instances will reference that instance. A new Consumer can be created passing a different Provider thanks to the second constructor. In fact, someone could also extend Provider and create Consumers with instances of the child class –  Jonathan Morales Vélez Nov 27 '13 at 16:16
    
@JonathanMoralesVélez yes, it's a bad singleton. –  kenny Nov 27 '13 at 19:52

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

1) The first constructor is using static dependency injection. This pattern allows classes derived from Provider to be injected for testing purposes, or as an alternative to the default Provider implementation at runtime. Provider itself may be a service locator - that depends on what objects or services it actually provides.

In this example, though, Provider is injected into Consumer. That's dependency injection, not service locator (which requires a class to determine it's own dependencies, causing close coupling between them). Thanks to the dependency injection, it doesn't matter to the Consumer class if it gets the default implementation of Provider, or a class derived from it. The classes could be more loosely coupled if a) Provider was an interface, and b) if client code always determined which instance to inject, instead of having a default.

2) Personally, I think static providers are a code smell, but they do work, and may be completely appropriate in your code-base. Ideally, Provider should be a singleton factory injected by a dependency injection framework. We have static providers in the code-base I work on at the moment, and I'm slowly replacing them in this way. Consumer should have a single constructor - the second one.

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Isn't such a provider facility - like you describe - a service locator? Maybe I have a totally wrong understanding of that Service Locator thing. ;) –  codefruit Nov 27 '13 at 15:34
    
I've updated my answer. If you need some more detail, I'll add some. –  Chris Mantle Nov 27 '13 at 15:56

The second constructor uses the dependency injection pattern, what is the first one doing? Service location?

Assuming that Provider is the dependency itself and not some kind of registry then no, it's still dependency injection. You are just providing a default value for the dependency for convenience.

Is it common practice to provide such an overloaded ctor which uses a default instance? Or are there better ways to do something like this? (I would like to avoid implementing a wrapper class).

It's definitely OK, but you might want to consider a factory method as an alternative to a default constructor:

public static Consumer CreateDefault()
{
    return new Consumer(Provider.Default);
}

This way you avoid the possibility of your clients glossing over the fact that the default constructor makes a (possibly important) choice on their behalf.

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Thanks for the hint with the factory method. –  codefruit Nov 27 '13 at 15:27

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