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I got error of "field has incomplete type" but nor sure why. Can someone please help? Thanks!

g++ -pipe -W -Wall -fopenmp -ggdb3 -DDEBUG -fno-omit-frame-pointer  -c -o test.o ../../src/test.cc  
In file included from ../../src/test.cc:50:  
../../src/feature_haar.h:14: error: field ‘_count’ has incomplete type  

test.cc

#include "feature_count.h"  
#include "feature_random_counts.h"  
#include "feature_corner.h"  
#include "feature_haar.h" // line 50  

feature_haar.h

#ifndef FEATURE_HAAR_H  
#define FEATURE_HAAR_H  

#include "misc.h"  
#include "feature.h"  
#include "vignette.h"  
#include "feature_count.h"  
#include <cassert>  

class FeatureHaar: public Feature    
{  
 public:  

  FeatureCount _count;// line 14  
...  
}  
#endif  

feature_count.h

#ifndef FEATURE_COUNT_H  
#define FEATURE_COUNT_H  

#include "misc.h"  
#include "feature.h"  
#include "random_rect.h"  
//#include "feature_integral_img.h"  


class FeatureCount: public Feature {  

  public:  

   RandomRect _rect;  


   char _type[buffer_size];  


   // This method returns an upper-caps string to identify the feature  
   const char *name() ;  

   FeatureCount();  


   FeatureCount( int width, int height, const char *type = "black-count", float WHRatio=-1, int roi_x=0, int roi_y=0, int roi_w=0, int roi_h=0 );  


   ~FeatureCount();  




   // compute features from original data i.e. image  
   void compute(double *integral_image, double *feature);  


   // IO  
   void write_humanreadable(ostream *out);  
   void write(ostream *out);  
   void read(istream *in):  
 };  


#endif  

feature.h

 #ifndef FEATURE_H  
 #define FEATURE_H  

 #include "misc.h"  
 #include "vignette.h"  


 class Feature {// generate the feature from the original data of an example, not responsible for holding the feature.  
 public:  
   int _dim;  


   // We need a virtual destructor since there are virtual methods  
   virtual ~Feature();  

   // This method returns an upper-caps string to identify the feature  
   virtual const char *name() = 0;  


   // write the data into files  
  static void write_matrix_data(double ** features, int *labels, int nb_examples, int dim, const char * filename);  
  static void write_index_data(double ** features,int *labels, int nb_examples, int dim, const char * filename);  
  static void write_compact_data(double ** features, int *labels, int nb_examples, int dim, const char * filename);  



   // compute features from original data i.e. image  
   virtual void compute(Vignette *vignette, double * feature); // this function/class not responsible for allocating/deallocation memory for array feature  
   virtual void compute(double *integral_image, double *feature);  



 // feature preprocessing  

   // scaling each feature s.t. its sample max = 1 and min = 0   
   static void scale_features(double *Data, int dim, double *scales_min, double *scales_max);  
   static void compute_linear_scale(double **Data, int size, int dim, double *scales_min, double *scales_max);  

   // standardize each feature s.t. its sample mean = 0 and sample standard deviation = 1  
   static void standardize_features(double *Data, int dim, double *mean, double *std);  
   static void compute_standardization(double **Data, int size, int dim, double *mean, double *std);  


 };  

 #endif  
share|improve this question
    
Can you post Feature.h as well? There is nothing in this code snippet that should be causing problems. –  Igor Zevaka Jan 8 '10 at 0:17
1  
get g++ to spit out the preprocessed source, that should hopefully make the immediate cause of the problem obvious –  moonshadow Jan 8 '10 at 0:18
1  
Tim: check test.i for the order of definitions for FeatureHaar and FeatureCount, then work backwards to see how the #includes are performed. What you describe is common with include-guard issues (such as duplication or typos) and recursive #includes---they are solved the same way, but I see no evidence of those particular issues here. –  Roger Pate Jan 8 '10 at 0:46
1  
Also try a test_feature_haar.cc that just has #include "feature_haar.h"---it should compile without warnings or errors, if the code is correct. –  Roger Pate Jan 8 '10 at 0:50
1  
If FeatureCount is defined before FeatureHaar, then you cannot get the error you are seeing (defining a type makes it complete). Something you've not shown here in the question is occuring. –  Roger Pate Jan 8 '10 at 0:52

5 Answers 5

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Thanks for all the people helping me. It's my bad. The definition of FeatureCount is not right. Its member

void read(istream *in): 

should be ended with ";" not ":".

How such a small typo so hard to find?

share|improve this answer
6  
That's a really good question: Why can't compilers be more specific about errors that they report. Answer: Because it's really hard, and the compiler has very little notion of context. Sounds like a fun thing to work on. –  Richard Pennington Jan 8 '10 at 2:34
    
Actually, I'll rephrase the question to be more subjective and argumentative: Which parsing method is best able to produce the best human readable error messages? –  Richard Pennington Jan 8 '10 at 2:39
    
Richard: the EDG front-end is pretty good, used by comeau, which you can try online: comeaucomputing.com/tryitout –  Roger Pate Jan 8 '10 at 14:25
    
Tim: Even though you answered it and it was pretty much impossible for us to find it (without just asking you for more and more details), seems like you should accept this answer since it is the solution. –  Roger Pate Jan 8 '10 at 14:27

If two classes are using each other, one must be a pointer because the class cannot be used until the full declaration is received.

For example:

b.h

#ifndef _B
#define _B
#include "A.h"
class B
{
    public:
    B();
    A a;
};
#endif

a.h

#ifndef _A
#define _A
class B;
class A
{
    public:
    A();
    B b;
};
#endif

There are two problems:

  1. class A cannot be compiled because B is being used without the full declaration. Adding #include "b.h" will not work because: a.h -- include "b.h" b.h -- include "a.h" no declaration since guarded so class b cannot create 'A a;'

  2. Even if it did compile, A would create B, then B creates A; then A creates B; then B creates A until it crashes.

This will work:

B.h

#ifndef _B
#define _B
#include <iostream>
#include "A.h"
class B
{
    public:
    B() {}
    A a;
    void hi() {std::cout << "hi" << std::endl;}
};
#endif

A.h

#ifndef _A
#define _A
class B;
class A
{
    public:
    A();
    void set(B *p);
    void sayHi();
    private:
    B *b;
};
#endif

A.cpp

#include "A.h"
#include "B.h"

A::A() : b(0) {}

void A::set(B *p) {b=p;}

void A::sayHi() { if(b) b->hi(); }

int main()
{
    A a;
    B b;
    a.set(&b);
    a.sayHi();
    return 0;
}

g++ -g -oworks A.cpp

works

hi

share|improve this answer

It look like it might be RandomRect.

share|improve this answer

Without seeing all the code the likeliest problem is that one of the classes down the inheritance chain of Feature_Haar is simply a forward declaration.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/200xfxh6.aspx

Still can't see anything that might be causing this. Start going through all your include files and look for forward declarations like this:

struct SomeStruct; class Someclass;

share|improve this answer

Because it apparently has an incomplete type. We'd need to see the definition of FeatureCount to say anything intelligent about why it's an incomplete type.

share|improve this answer
    
FeatureCount definition is just added. –  Tim Jan 8 '10 at 0:24
    
Great. That solved the problem then? –  Hans Passant Jan 8 '10 at 0:59

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