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Is it possible in MySQL (in any version) to declare and use a table with a self-referential, not null, foreign key column referring to the AUTO_INCREMENT primary key of the same table?

Essentially, I'd like to create the following table, the rows of which represent a forest of trees. I'd like the root nodes in the hierarchy to be indicated by the parent_id of the row being equal to the id (rather than allowing NULL in parent_id to indicate the root).

e.g.

CREATE TABLE forest (
    id BIGINT NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY AUTO_INCREMENT,
    parent_id BIGINT NOT NULL,
        CONSTRAINT fk_forest_parent_id FOREIGN KEY(parent_id) REFERENCES forest(id),
    name VARCHAR(20) NOT NULL UNIQUE
);

Creating this table works (5.0.44sp1-enterprise-gpl-nt-log MySQL Enterprise Server (GPL)). However it does not appear to be possible to use LAST_INSERT_ID() to insert the parent_id of root nodes (which is not much of a surprise). The following doesn't work for example :

INSERT INTO forest(parent_id, name) VALUES (LAST_INSERT_ID(), "root 1");

The following does work, but is no longer making use of the auto increment:

INSERT INTO forest(id, parent_id, name) VALUES (1234, 1234, "root 1");

Is there a way to use a table defined in this way whilst still relying on the automatically generated PK, and whilst also retaining all of the constraints (NOT NULL, and FOREIGN KEY)?

UPDATE - POSSIBLE SOLUTIONS:

START TRANSACTION;
SET FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS = 0;
INSERT INTO forest(parent_id, name) VALUES (0, "root X");
UPDATE forest SET parent_id = LAST_INSERT_ID() WHERE id = LAST_INSERT_ID();
SET FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS = 1; /* This seems to be important. */
COMMIT;
share|improve this question
    
Leave the parent nullable. If you want it to be the same value as the id the you can add a calculated column seriously_this_parent_id As Coalesce(parent_id, id) –  gvee Nov 27 '13 at 16:01
    
There's nothing wrong in such kind of keys. But using LAST_INSERT_ID() in the same statement where the ID is going to be generated will obviously not work. –  Álvaro G. Vicario Nov 27 '13 at 16:02

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It's impossible to know what the id of a row is going to be before the INSERT completes, so calling LAST_INSERT_ID() when no INSERT has been done does not do anything. Instead you would need two separate statements (which could be run as a transaction in a stored procedure or what have you).

INSERT INTO forest(name) VALUES ("root 1");
UPDATE forest SET parent_id = LAST_INSERT_ID() WHERE id = LAST_INSERT_ID();

I don't think it makes sense for a root node to reference itself as a parent, though. Just saying.

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Tried that (inside a START TRANSACTION ... COMMIT). Fails with Error: Field 'parent_id' doesn't have a default value. –  Paul Nov 27 '13 at 16:24
    
@Paul I didn't think about that. You can either make the parent_id nullable (which you probably want to avoid) or set it to 0 –  Explosion Pills Nov 27 '13 at 16:28
    
BTW. It seemed reasonable to me to use 'PK == FK implies root' both because nearly all the nodes do have a parent (hence NOT NULL) and - in particular - because the the root nodes are actually going to be pre-created and permanently owned by a parent type (different table). [This is all happening underneath a Java data access layer I'm working on.] –  Paul Nov 27 '13 at 16:29
    
Can't set parent_id to 0 - its a foreign key. Error: Cannot add or update a child row: a foreign key constraint fails (forest, CONSTRAINT fk_forest_parent_id FOREIGN KEY (parent_id) REFERENCES forest(id)) –  Paul Nov 27 '13 at 16:31
    
@Paul that means that you need to have some kind of a genesis node that does have an id of 0, or you can do SET FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS = 0 for the transaction –  Explosion Pills Nov 27 '13 at 16:38

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