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How can I use HttpWebRequest (.NET, C#) asynchronously?

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1  
Check out this article on Developer Fusion: developerfusion.com/code/4654/asynchronous-httpwebrequest – Jeremy Reagan Oct 14 '08 at 19:24
    
You can also see the following, for a pretty complete example of doing what Jason is asking: stuff.seans.com/2009/01/05/… Sean – Sean Sexton Apr 8 '09 at 19:43
1  
use async msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… – Raj Kaimal Mar 26 '10 at 22:55
1  
for a moment, I wondered if you were trying to comment on a recursive thread? – Kyle Hodgson May 20 '10 at 3:17
up vote 100 down vote accepted

Use HttpWebRequest.BeginGetResponse()

HttpWebRequest webRequest;

void StartWebRequest()
{
    webRequest.BeginGetResponse(new AsyncCallback(FinishWebRequest), null);
}

void FinishWebRequest(IAsyncResult result)
{
    webRequest.EndGetResponse(result);
}

The callback function is called when the asynchronous operation is complete. You need to at least call EndGetResponse() from this function.

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8  
BeginGetResponse is not that useful for async usage. It seems to block while trying to contact the resource. Try unplugging your network cable or giving it a malformed uri, and then running this code. Instead you probably need to run GetResponse on a second thread you provide. – Ash Oct 21 '12 at 3:52
2  
@AshleyHenderson - Could you please provide me a sample? – Tohid Nov 14 '12 at 14:28
    
@Tohid here is a full class with sample I've used with Unity3D. – cregox May 27 '13 at 23:17
    
You should add webRequest.Proxy = null to speed up the request dramatically. – Trontor Oct 30 '13 at 10:55

Considering the answer:

HttpWebRequest webRequest;

void StartWebRequest()
{
    webRequest.BeginGetResponse(new AsyncCallback(FinishWebRequest), null);
}

void FinishWebRequest(IAsyncResult result)
{
    webRequest.EndGetResponse(result);
}

You could send the request pointer or any other object like this:

void StartWebRequest()
{
    HttpWebRequest webRequest = ...;
    webRequest.BeginGetResponse(new AsyncCallback(FinishWebRequest), webRequest);
}

void FinishWebRequest(IAsyncResult result)
{
    HttpWebResponse response = (result.AsyncState as HttpWebRequest).EndGetResponse(result) as HttpWebResponse;
}

Greetings

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6  
+1 for the option that doesn't over-scope the 'request' variable, but you could have made a cast instead of using "as" keyword. An InvalidCastException would be thrown instead of a confuse NullReferenceException – Davi Fiamenghi Jun 30 '12 at 20:38

Everyone so far has been wrong, because BeginGetResponse() does some work on the current thread. From the documentation:

The BeginGetResponse method requires some synchronous setup tasks to complete (DNS resolution, proxy detection, and TCP socket connection, for example) before this method becomes asynchronous. As a result, this method should never be called on a user interface (UI) thread because it might take considerable time (up to several minutes depending on network settings) to complete the initial synchronous setup tasks before an exception for an error is thrown or the method succeeds.

So to do this right:

void DoWithResponse(HttpWebRequest request, Action<HttpWebResponse> responseAction)
{
    Action wrapperAction = () =>
    {
        request.BeginGetResponse(new AsyncCallback((iar) =>
        {
            var response = (HttpWebResponse)((HttpWebRequest)iar.AsyncState).EndGetResponse(iar);
            responseAction(response);
        }), request);
    };
    wrapperAction.BeginInvoke(new AsyncCallback((iar) =>
    {
        var action = (Action)iar.AsyncState;
        action.EndInvoke(iar);
    }), wrapperAction);
}

You can then do what you need to with the response. For example:

HttpWebRequest request;
// init your request...then:
DoWithResponse(request, (response) => {
    var body = new StreamReader(response.GetResponseStream()).ReadToEnd();
    Console.Write(body);
});
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1  
Could you not just call the GetResponseAsync method of the HttpWebRequest using await (assuming you made your function async)? I've very new to C# so this may be complete jibberish... – Brad Feb 20 '13 at 23:17
    
GetResponseAsync looks good, though you'll need .NET 4.5 (currently beta). – Isak Feb 21 '13 at 17:23
8  
Jesus. That is some ugly code. Why can't async code be readable? – John Shedletsky May 14 '13 at 1:25
    
Why do you need request.BeginGetResponse()? Why wrapperAction.BeginInvoke() does not suffice? – Gatis Aug 21 '15 at 0:41
1  
@Gatis There are two levels of asynchronous calls - wrapperAction.BeginInvoke() is the first asynchronous call to the lambda expression which calls request.BeginGetResponse(), which is the second asynchronous call. As Isak points out, BeginGetResponse() requires some synchronous setup, which is why he wraps it in an additional asynchronous call. – walkingTarget Nov 11 '15 at 17:12

By far the easiest way is by using TaskFactory.FromAsync from the TPL. It's literally a couple of lines of code when used in conjunction with the new async/await keywords:

var request = WebRequest.Create("http://www.stackoverflow.com");
var response = (HttpWebResponse) await Task.Factory
    .FromAsync<WebResponse>(request.BeginGetResponse,
                            request.EndGetResponse,
                            null);
Debug.Assert(response.StatusCode == HttpStatusCode.OK);

If you can't use the C#5 compiler then the above can be accomplished using the Task.ContinueWith method:

Task.Factory.FromAsync<WebResponse>(request.BeginGetResponse,
                                    request.EndGetResponse,
                                    null)
    .ContinueWith(task =>
    {
        var response = (HttpWebResponse) task.Result;
        Debug.Assert(response.StatusCode == HttpStatusCode.OK);
    });
share|improve this answer
    
Since .NET 4 this TAP approach is preferable. See a similar example from MS - "How to: Wrap EAP Patterns in a Task" (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee622454.aspx) – Klaus Jul 17 '15 at 4:19
    
Way easier than the other ways – Don Rolling Apr 8 at 20:39

I ended up using BackgroundWorker, it is definitely asynchronous unlike some of the above solutions, it handles returning to the GUI thread for you, and it is very easy to understand.

It is also very easy to handle exceptions, as they end up in the RunWorkerCompleted method, but make sure you read this: Unhandled exceptions in BackgroundWorker

I used WebClient but obviously you could use HttpWebRequest.GetResponse if you wanted.

var worker = new BackgroundWorker();

worker.DoWork += (sender, args) => {
    args.Result = new WebClient().DownloadString(settings.test_url);
};

worker.RunWorkerCompleted += (sender, e) => {
    if (e.Error != null) {
        connectivityLabel.Text = "Error: " + e.Error.Message;
    } else {
        connectivityLabel.Text = "Connectivity OK";
        Log.d("result:" + e.Result);
    }
};

connectivityLabel.Text = "Testing Connectivity";
worker.RunWorkerAsync();
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public void GetResponseAsync (HttpWebRequest request, Action<HttpWebResponse> gotResponse)
    {
        if (request != null) { 
            request.BeginGetRequestStream ((r) => {
                try { // there's a try/catch here because execution path is different from invokation one, exception here may cause a crash
                    HttpWebResponse response = request.EndGetResponse (r);
                    if (gotResponse != null) 
                        gotResponse (response);
                } catch (Exception x) {
                    Console.WriteLine ("Unable to get response for '" + request.RequestUri + "' Err: " + x);
                }
            }, null);
        } 
    }
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