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Let me explain the scenario I am facing: I have a perl file that, among other things, creates a 'header' string used by another process. This is defined in the perl script (script.pl) as:

$str = "START\n" .
"PARAM1=blah\n" .
"PARAM2=blah2\n" .
"PARAM3=blah3\n";

etc

I need to modify the value of $str by appending more values from a bash script, so I thought I would use sed. This is what I have so far:

str_new="\"NEWPARAM1=blah\" .\n\"NEWPARAM2=blah2\" .\n";
sed -i "/START/{n;s/^/$str_new/}" script.pl

This sort of works, what I'm getting is:

$str = "START\n" .
       "NEWPARAM1=blah" .
       "NEWPARAM2=blah2" .
       "PARAM1=blah\n" .
       "PARAM2=blah2\n" .
       "PARAM3=blah3\n";

However, what I need is the literal '\n' to appear as well after the new parameters I've added:

$str = "START\n" .
       "NEWPARAM1=blah\n" .
       "NEWPARAM2=blah2\n" .
       "PARAM1=blah\n" .
       "PARAM2=blah2\n" .
       "PARAM3=blah3\n";

I've tried using '\n', \n in the sed replace clause but no luck. Any help would be appreciated

share|improve this question
    
What language is this? This is not sh or bash. –  Jo So Nov 27 '13 at 16:51
    
Sorry, forgot to mention I'm using this inside a bash script –  Rahul Popuri Nov 27 '13 at 16:52
    
Yes, what I get then is $str = "START\n" . "NEWPARAM1=blah " . "NEWPARAM2=blah2 " . etc. Incase the formatting is messed up, what it does is interpret the \\n as another newline character so it adds a newline after blah, and then another newline after the '.' –  Rahul Popuri Nov 27 '13 at 16:58
    
Wouldn't it be easier to just do the whole thing in Perl? –  Keith Thompson Nov 27 '13 at 17:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Use it like this:

str_new='"NEWPARAM1=blah\\n" .\n"NEWPARAM2=blah2\\n" .\n'
sed -i.bak "/START/{n;s/^/$str_new/;}" script.pl

cat script.pl
$str = "START\n" .
"NEWPARAM1=blah\n" .
"NEWPARAM2=blah2\n" .
"PARAM1=blah\n" .
"PARAM2=blah2\n" .
"PARAM3=blah3\n";
share|improve this answer
    
This worked perfectly! Thanks so much –  Rahul Popuri Nov 27 '13 at 18:08
    
You're welcome, glad that it worked out for you. –  anubhava Nov 27 '13 at 18:10
    
just be carefful with the use of $, \1 -> \9 and & in your str_new because there are the few RegEx vlaue used in replacement part of a s// –  NeronLeVelu Nov 28 '13 at 7:16
1  
Could you elaborate on this? I don't think it will be an issue for me as there is a predefined set of data from which these parameters will be populated, so I can test every case –  Rahul Popuri Nov 28 '13 at 21:51

I would consider using a heredoc in the perl to simplify the problem:

$str = <<EOT;
START
PARAM1=blah
PARAM2=blah2
PARAM3=blah3
EOT
share|improve this answer

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