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I have a .csv file that I have loaded into R using the following basic command:

lace <- read.csv("lace for R.csv")

It pulls in my data just fine. Here is the str of the data:

str(lace)
'data.frame':   2054 obs. of  20 variables:
 $ Admission.Day       : Factor w/ 872 levels "1/1/2013","1/10/2011",..: 231 238 238 50 59 64 64 64 67 67 ...
 $ Year                : int  2010 2010 2010 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 ...
 $ Month               : int  12 12 12 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ...
 $ Day                 : int  28 30 30 3 4 6 6 6 7 7 ...
 $ DayOfWeekNumber     : int  3 5 5 2 3 5 5 5 6 6 ...
 $ Day.of.Week         : Factor w/ 7 levels "Friday","Monday",..: 6 5 5 2 6 5 5 5 1 1 ...

What I am trying to do is create three (3) different histograms and then plot them all together on one. I want to create a histogram for each year, where the x axis or labels will be the days of the week starting with Sunday and ending on Saturday.

Firstly how would I go about creating a histogram out of Factors, which the days of the week are in?

Secondly how do I create a histogram for the days of the week for a given year?

I have tried using the following post here but cannot get it working. I use the Admission.Day as the variable and get an error message:

dat <- as.Date(lace$Admission.Day)

Error in charToDate(x) : character string is not in a standard unambiguous format

Thank you,

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1  
The first thing you need to do is read the documentation for ?as.Date, in particular the description for the format argument. Next, you'll want to look at the function ?weekdays. –  joran Nov 27 '13 at 17:32
1  
as.Date needs an origin dat <- as.Date(lace$Admission.Day, origin="1970-01-01") –  Ricardo Saporta Nov 27 '13 at 17:32
    
@joran got all the dates now, thank you for pointing out the format part, not having an origin as specified by excel was really throwing everything off. –  MCP_infiltrator Nov 27 '13 at 18:00
    
weird I do the same thing three times over and one of the files does not work –  MCP_infiltrator Nov 27 '13 at 19:10
1  
Sounds like your problem is with importing dates, rather than making histograms. If your data starts out in Excel, I'd strongly recommend you consider the XLConnect package, especially loadWorkbook(...) and readWorksheet(...). In my experience, this package does a much better job interpreting Excel dates. See the documentation here. –  jlhoward Nov 27 '13 at 21:31

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Expanding on the comment above: the problem seems to be with importing dates, rather than making the histogram. Assuming there is an excel workbook "lace for R.xlsx", with a sheet "lace":

## Not tested...
library(XLConnect)
myData <- "lace for R.xlsx"             # NOTE: need path also...
wb     <- loadWorkbook(myData)
lace   <- readWorksheet(wb, sheet="lace")
lace$Admission.Day <- as.Date(lace$Admission.Day)

should provide dates that work with all the R date functions. Also, the lubridate package provides a number of functions that are more intuitive to use than format(...).

Then, as an example:

library(lubridate)   # for year(...) and wday(...)
library(ggplot2)
# random dates around Jun 1, across 5 years...
set.seed(123)
lace <- data.frame(date=as.Date(rnorm(1000,sd=50)+365*(0:4),origin="2008/6/1"))
lace$year <- factor(year(lace$date))
lace$dow  <- wday(lace$date, label=T)
# This creates the histograms...
ggplot(lace) +
  geom_histogram(aes(x=dow, fill=year)) +      # fill color by year
  facet_grid(~year) +                          # facet by year
  theme(axis.text.x=element_text(angle=90))    # to rotate weekday names...

Produces this: enter image description here

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very helpful thank you –  MCP_infiltrator Nov 28 '13 at 16:14

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