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I am following Advanced Linux Programming book.

Mutex can be initialized dynamically by Using the init function:

  pthread_mutex_t theMutex;
  pthread_mutex_init(&theMutex, NULL);

Mutex can be initialized statically by macro

 pthread_mutex_t result = PTHREAD_MUTEX_INITIALIZER;

The book says that we have to call "pthread_mutex_destroy(&theMutex)" if we create mutex dynamically, mutex will be created in heap area so we have to delete it manually.

But if we create mutex statically the effect shall be equivalent to dynamic initialization by a call to pthread_mutex_init() with parameter attr specified as NULL, except that no error checks are performed.

I think with statically allocated mutexes, threads of the same program can only share it until their scope ends, but with dynamically allocated mutexes, threads of different program would be able to interact with the mutex.

Is my understanding correct? And if any other differences are there please mention it.

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I think with statically allocated mutexes, threads of the same program can only share it until their scope ends,

A static allocation is an allocation that is made when the program starts up and is released when the program shuts down, so it will not just end with the scope.

but with dynamically allocated mutexes, threads of different program would be able to interact with the mutex.

What do you mean by different programs? If you mean inter-process communication, then no.

Take a look at this SO answer, its all a bit more complicated as it seems.

If possible, i suggest you to use the boost library, or if your compiler supports it, std::thread C++11 extentension(when programing c++).

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the link does not give information about dynamic allocation of mutexes. – Santosh Sahu Nov 27 '13 at 19:15

Using PTHREAD_MUTEX_INITIALIZER is not compulsory for a static mutex, but it is available. It sets a common group of default attributes for a mutex - there are a couple of other initializers for recursive and error check mutexes too, instead of the stock 'normal fast mutexes'. Think of it as simply assigning values to the members of the opaque pthread_mutex_t struct. pthread_mutex_init does a bunch of verification on the attributes, but does not actually allocate anything.

IIRC Calling destroy on a mutex sets the 'kind' of the mutex to an invalid value so that attempting to use it again fails. Before it does that it also attempts to see if the mutex is currently in use elsewhere, and will return EBUSY if it is. I do not have the nptl source code on here to verify but I think that is about it.

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