Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to overload operators [] and '=' for a class that contains file for writing to position in the file. For example this code should work:

    UserFileClass File;
    printf("%c",File[53]);  //printing character from the 53 position in the file
    File[34]='d';   //34th character in the file will be rewriten with d

But how to do that, if after overloading [] for returning char, we cannot overwrite anything in the object with '=' operator. I tried to do that in other way but it doesn't work too:

    #include <iostream>
    #include <fstream>

    using namespace std;

    class File
    {


fstream file;
    char buffer;
    int charPos;
public:

    File(string fileName);
    ~File(){file.close();};

    File & operator[](int position);
    File & operator=(const char &);
    friend ostream & operator<<(ostream,File);
};

File::File(string fileName)
{
    file.open(fileName);
    if(!file)
    {
        cerr<<"File reading error";
        exit(1);
    }
}

ostream & operator<<(ostream outStream, File obj)
{
    outStream<<obj.buffer;
    return outStream;
}

File & File::operator[](int position)
{
    file.seekg(position);
    if(file.eof())
    {
        buffer='\0';
    }
    else
    {
        file.read(&buffer,1);
        charPos=position;
    }
    return *this;
}

File & File::operator=(const char & charValue)
{
    file.seekg(charPos);
    file.write(&charValue,1);
    return *this;
}

void main()
{
    File userFile("file.txt");
    cout<<userFile[2];
    userFile[4]='a';
}

Compilation Error:Error 2 error C2248: std::basic_ios<_Elem,_Traits>::basic_ios:cannot access private member ...

share|improve this question
1  
std::ostream isn't copyable. –  chris Nov 27 '13 at 18:55
    
printf is C, not C++. –  Zac Howland Nov 27 '13 at 18:57
    
outStream<<obj.buffer; here you are accessing private member "buffer"...write a getter for buffer –  Nik Nov 27 '13 at 18:57
    
@ZacHowland Formally, it's both. But of course there's no reason to use it in C++, given it's notable problems. –  James Kanze Nov 27 '13 at 19:05
    
@JamesKanze Only through the inheritance mechanism that C++ has with C. When asking a question tagged as "C++" (and not tagged as "C"), printf (and any of its sister functions) does not belong. –  Zac Howland Nov 27 '13 at 19:08
show 1 more comment

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The usual solution would be for the operator[] to return a proxy, along the lines of:

class UserFile
{
    //...
    char get( int index ) const { ... }
    void set( int index, char newValue ) { ... }
    class Proxy
    {
        UserFile* myOwner;
        int myIndex;
    public:
        Proxy( UserFile* owner, int index )
            : myOwner( owner )
            , myIndex( index )
        {
        }
        Proxy const& operator=( char ch ) const
        {
            myOwner->set( myIndex, ch ):
            return *this;
        }
        operator char() const
        {
            return myOwner->get( myIndex );
        }
    };
    Proxy operator[]( int index )
    {
        return Proxy( this, index );
    }
};

Of course, this won't work when matching ... in a function call, so you can't use it directly with printf. (But then, there's really no excuse for using printf in C++. Or any other function which has varargs.) You'd have to explicitly cast it the char:

printf( "%c", static_cast<char>( file[42] ) );
share|improve this answer
    
You could do it without the proxy by using seekg and read, though. And it would not require a cast. –  Zac Howland Nov 27 '13 at 19:12
    
@ZacHowland The goal, IIUC, is to support the [] syntax. How else would you do it without the proxy. (And since this is C++, the fact that it doesn't work seamlessly with printf isn't an issue; it does work with std::ostream.) –  James Kanze Nov 28 '13 at 9:03
    
If that is his goal, then this may be an XY problem. The behavior of operator[] would have to be drastically different depending on the direction (e.g. file[3] = 'd' would have to write to the file, cout << file[3] would have to read from it). Loading the entire file into a string and manipulating it would be a better solution (at the very least, it would decrease all the disk reads and writes). –  Zac Howland Nov 29 '13 at 14:34
    
@ZacHowland I think that is his goal; it is, at any rate, a frequent goal, and a proxy is the usual solution. As to reading the file into memory and working on it there: that doesn't really change the issue, because you still have to catch the writes, and mark the buffer as dirty, so you know to write it out. –  James Kanze Nov 29 '13 at 14:38
add comment
ostream & operator<<(ostream outStream, File obj)

That declaration is wrong. It should be:

ostream& operator<<(ostream& outStream, File obj)
                    ^^^^^^^^ .................... Note the &       

Additionally, I don't see a need for this class at all. It seems to be a wrapper around fstream, but is doing nothing that fstream does not already do, and has to use it to boot.

Side note: Assuming this class is defined in a header file, you do not want to place a using namespace std; in the header file!

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.