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I am attempting to learn Python, and I got stuck on one of my practice problems.

  • Answered* First question: I understand how to get the average of a list, but is there a better loop to use?

Second question: In my second function, why am I not appending the ints greater than zero in x?

Instructions:

Implement the following three functions (you should use an appropriate looping construct to compute the averages):

  • allNumAvg(numList) : takes a list of numbers and returns the average of all the numbers in the list.
  • posNumAvg(numList) : takes a list of numbers and returns the average of all the numbers in the list that are greater than zero.
  • nonPosAvg(numList) : takes a list of numbers and returns the average of all the numbers in the list that are less than or equal to zero.

Write a program that asks the user to enter some numbers (positives, negatives and zeros). Your program should NOT ask the user to enter a fixed number of numbers. Also it should NOT ask for the number of numbers the user wants to enter. But rather it should ask the user to enter a few numbers and end with -9999 (a sentinel value). The user can enter the numbers in any order. Your program should NOT ask the user to enter the positive and the negative numbers separately.

Your program then should create a list with the numbers entered (make sure NOT to include the sentinel value (-9999) in this list) and output the list and a dictionary with the following Key-Value pairs (using the input list and the above functions):

  • Key = 'AvgPositive' : Value = the average of all the positive numbers
  • Key = 'AvgNonPos' : Value = the average of all the non-positive numbers
  • Key = 'AvgAllNum' : Value = the average of all the numbers Sample run:

Enter a number (-9999 to end): 4 Enter a number (-9999 to end): -3 Enter a number (-9999 to end): -15 Enter a number (-9999 to end): 0 Enter a number (-9999 to end): 10 Enter a number (-9999 to end): 22 Enter a number (-9999 to end): -9999

The list of all numbers entered is: [4, -3, -15, 0, 10, 22]

The dictionary with averages is: {'AvgPositive': 12.0, 'AvgNonPos': -6.0, 'AvgAllNum': 3.0}

def nums():
    values = []

    while -9999 not in values:
        x = int(input("Enter any amount of numbers or -9999 to quit: "))

        values.append(x)
    values.remove(-9999)

    return values

def allNumAvg(values):
    average = 0
    sum = 0
    for n in values:
        sum = sum + n
        average = sum / len(values)

    return average

def posNumAvg(values):
    x = []
    average = 0
    sum = 0

    if int in values > 0:
        x.append(int)

    print(x)

print(posNumAvg(nums()))
share|improve this question
    
Thank you for the edit. Much more readable. –  TYPKRFT Nov 27 '13 at 19:40
    
Sorry I was curious if there was a better loop to use. –  TYPKRFT Nov 27 '13 at 19:41
1  
Why not just return sum(values)/len(values)? –  Chris Martin Nov 27 '13 at 19:44

1 Answer 1

Your allNumAvg function needs a change:

def allNumAvg(values):
    average = 0
    sum = 0
    for n in values:
        sum = sum + n

    # this shouldn't happen inside the loop
    average = sum / len(values)

    return average

I'm not sure why you would write that and not just return sum(values)/len(values), though.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for that edit. I didnt realize you could return a formula! Learning new stuff everyday! –  TYPKRFT Nov 27 '13 at 19:45
1  
It's not really any more or less a "formula"... It's just shorter code. –  Chris Martin Nov 27 '13 at 19:46
    
OK i just didnt realize you could return anything more than a variable i guess. –  TYPKRFT Nov 27 '13 at 19:49
1  
@TYPKRFT Think about it like return <expression>. You might be used to only returning a variable, like average, but actually average is also an <expression>, namely, the value of average. –  Prashant Kumar Nov 27 '13 at 19:53
    
Should I make another question for my second question? Sorry I am not sure about the etiquette of the site. –  TYPKRFT Nov 27 '13 at 20:09

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