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I am trying to convert the following set of characters into their corresponding values for a quality score that accompanies a fasta file:

!"#$%&'()*+,-./0123456789:;<=>?@ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ[\]^_`abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz{|}~

They should have the values 0-93. So when I input a fastq file that uses these symbols I want to output the numerical values for each in a quality score file.

I have tried putting them into an array using split // and then making into a hash where each key is the symbol and the value is its position in the array:

for (my $i = 0; $i<length(@qual); $i++) {
print "i is $i, elem is  $qual[$i]\n";
$hash{$qual[$i]} = $i;

I have tried hard coding the hash:

my %hash = {"!"=>"0", "\""=>"1", "#"=>"2", "\$"=>"3"...

With and without escapes for the special characters that require them but cannot seem to get this to work. This merely outputs:

.
.
.
i is 0, elem is  !
i is 1, elem is  "
i is 0, elem is  !
i is 1, elem is  "
i is 0, elem is  !
i is 1, elem is  "
" 1
Use of uninitialized value $hash{"HASH(0x100804ed0)"} in concatenation (.) or string at convert_fastq.pl line 24, <> line 40.
HASH(0x100804ed0) 
! 0

Does anyone have any ideas? I appreciate the help.

share|improve this question
    
Can you show the code that attempts to loop through %hash? – admdrew Nov 27 '13 at 19:34
    
foreach my $key (keys %hash){ print "$key $hash{$key}\n"; } – user3043189 Nov 27 '13 at 19:45
    
length(@array) doesn't do what you think. – Jim Davis Nov 27 '13 at 23:40
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Perhaps subtracting 33 from the character's ord to yield the value you want would be helpful:

use strict;
use warnings;

my $string = q{!"#$%&'()*+,-./0123456789:;<=>?@ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ[\]^_`abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz{|}~};

for ( split //, $string ) {
    print "$_ = ", ord($_) - 33, "\n";
}

Partial output:

! = 0
" = 1
# = 2
$ = 3
% = 4
& = 5
' = 6
( = 7
) = 8
* = 9
+ = 10
...

This way, you don't need to build a hash with character/value pairs, but just use $val = ord ($char) - 33; to get the value.

share|improve this answer
{ ... }

is similar to

do { my %anon; %anon = ( ... ); \%anon }

So when you did

my %hash = { ... };

you assigned a single item to the hash (a reference to a hash) rather than a list of key-values as you should. Perl warned you about that with the following:

Reference found where even-sized list expected

(Why didn't you mention this?!)

You should be using

my %decode_map = ( ... );

For example,

my %decode_map;
{
   my $encoded = q{!"#$%&'()*+,-./0123456789:;<=>?@ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ[\]^_`abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz{|}~};
   my @encoded = split //, $encoded;
   $decode_map{$encoded[$_]} = $_ for 0..$#encoded;
}

Given that those are basically the non-whitespace printable ASCII characters, so you could simply use

my %decode_map = map { chr($_ + 0x21) => $_ } 0x21..0x7E;

Which means you could avoid building the hash at all, replacing

my %decode_map = map { chr($_ + 0x21) => $_ } 0x21..0x7E;

die if !exists($decode_map{$c});
my $num = $decode_map{$c};

with just

die if ord($c) < 0x21 || ord($c) > 0x7E;
my $num = ord($c) - 0x21;
share|improve this answer

From a language-agnostic point of view: Use an array with 256 entries, one for each ASCII character. You can then store 0 at ['!'], 1 at ['"'] and so on. When parsing the input, you can lookup the index of a char in that array directly. Fore careful error handling, you could store -1 at all invalid chars and check that while parsing the file.

share|improve this answer

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