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This is probably a really stupid question, but how do I set an Environment Variable in Bash, then access it in a shell script?

kkeiper@machine:/home/kkeiper $ export APIKEY="adsf"

In bash script

#!/bin/bash

echo $APIKEY; # prints a blank line
echo $(env | grep APIKEY); # wouldn't return APIKEY even if it did work, but this also prints a blank string
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Your example works for me on GNU bash, version 3.2.48(1)-release (x86_64-apple-darwin10.0). Either $ export APIKEY="asdf"; ./foo.sh or env APIKEY=asdf ./foo.sh outputs asdf followed by APIKEY=asdf –  jez Nov 27 '13 at 19:40

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

What you show should work! It does for me:

$ export APIKEY="asfw"
$ cat script.sh
#!/bin/bash
echo $APIKEY
env | grep APIKEY
$ bash -x script.sh
+ echo asfw
asfw
+ env
+ grep APIKEY
APIKEY=asfw
$ sudo bash script.sh
Password:

$ 

Note that you don't need the semicolons or the echo $(...) notation in the script — but they don't do any damage either.

(Tested Mac OS X 10.9 Mavericks, Bash 3.2.51. However, I don't expect it to matter. Only true Bourne shells don't support the export VAR=value notation — and you'll have to look hard to find a shell with that limitation these days; Solaris /bin/sh, perhaps.)

Example with sudo added after question in comments. Yes, sudo unsets stray environment variables such as APIKEY.

More notes on sudo:

$ env | wc -l
      24
$ env | grep APIKEY
APIKEY=asfw
$ cat script.sh
#!/bin/bash
echo $APIKEY
env | grep APIKEY
env | wc -l
$ bash script.sh
asfw
APIKEY=asfw
      23
$ sudo bash script.sh

      18
$ 

One day, I'll investigate the what and the why for the difference between 24 and 23 environment variables without sudo being involved, but clearly sudo eliminated a number of variables (5 or 6, including APIKEY specifically).

How to ensure that environment variables are preserved?

If you know which ones need to be preserved, then:

  1. The sudo man page says:

    -E The -E (preserve environment) option will override the env_reset option in sudoers(5)). It is only available when either the matching command has the SETENV tag or the setenv option is set in sudoers(5).

  2. You can arrange to relay the environment variables to the commands environment:

    $ sudo -E bash script.sh
    Password:
    asfw
    APIKEY=asfw
          26
    $ sudo bash -c "APIKEY='$APIKEY' bash script.sh"
    asfw
    APIKEY=asfw
    SUDO_COMMAND=/bin/bash -c APIKEY='asfw' bash script.sh
          19
    $ 
    

    The appearance of SUDO_COMMAND in the environment is interesting.

    (Note that the bash script.sh notation is only needed because I've not made script.sh executable. If it was executable, I could type either script.sh or ./script.sh depending on whether it is in a directory on my $PATH or not.)

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would it not work if I'm running the script as sudo? –  Goldentoa11 Nov 27 '13 at 19:44
    
I'm writing a script to create an Apache vhost that then uses an API to add a new A record for the new test site, so I need to run as sudo. –  Goldentoa11 Nov 27 '13 at 19:45
    
Ah, mebbe, mebbe not...thinks — does sudo reset the environment? Yes, it does. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 27 '13 at 19:46
    
AHHHHH. That would be it then, because as soon as I disable the "root-check", then the script prints the right key –  Goldentoa11 Nov 27 '13 at 19:47
1  
For whatever it's worth, could you add how to preserve env variables to your answer? sudo -E ./mkhost-staging.sh kkeiper works for me –  Goldentoa11 Nov 27 '13 at 19:50

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