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I'm trying to write a python function that will take a 1D array of RGB values and make a list of 3x1 arrays that represent pixels. Here is my function

def RGBtoLMS(rgbValues, rgbLength): #Passing in a list of rgbValues and an int representing the length of that list
    pixel = numpy.empty((3, 1), int)
    allPixels = list()
    x = 0
    for h in xrange(rgbLength):
        for i in xrange(len(pixel)):
            for j in xrange(len(pixel[i])):
                if x < rgbLength: #For some reason, x reaches rgbLength...
                    pixel[i][j] = rgbValues[x]
                    x+=1
        allPixels.append(pixel)
        for pixel in allPixels:
            print pixel

When I run this code, I notice that with each iteration of my loops, instead of just adding each pixel onto the end of the list as the 3x1 array representing it is created, it replaces all values in the list with the latest pixel. The end result is a list as long as the length of my 1D array holding the original RGB values but all the elements in the list are a 3x1 array of the last RGB values. Also, is there a way I can write this so I don't need that if statement? I only need it because x reaches rgbLength even though for loops in python are (inclusive,exclusive)

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You might be interested in the reshape function that does this task for you.

For example:

import numpy
A = numpy.array( [1,2,3,101,102,103,4,5,6,104,105,106] )
B = A.reshape( (-1,3) )
print B

prints:

[[  1   2   3]
 [101 102 103]
 [  4   5   6]
 [104 105 106]]
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2  
I think you can use -1, e.g. A.reshape(-1, 3). –  DSM Nov 27 '13 at 19:49
    
Thanks, I've added this improvement –  Peter de Rivaz Nov 27 '13 at 19:52
    
Of course this gives you a 2D array rather than a list of 1D arrays. But (a) that's probably what you actually want, and (b) if it's not, list(B) will give you a list of the 1D rows trivially. So, either way, this is the way to go. –  abarnert Nov 27 '13 at 19:59
    
What is the effect of using a negative value in reshape? –  Nick Gilbert Nov 27 '13 at 20:06
    
It infers the dimension from the length of the array and the rest of the arguments (This is new to me: I just looked this up here after seeing DSM's suggestion ) –  Peter de Rivaz Nov 27 '13 at 20:09

I am just going to show why your code is not working. @peter de Rivaz's answer should be what you should do in numpy

When you allPixels.append(pixel), you are appending an incidence of pixel. If you change the value of pixel later, all the incidence of pixel changes. See this example:

>>> def RGBtoLMS(rgbValues, rgbLength): #Passing in a list of rgbValues and an int representing the length of that list
    pixel = numpy.empty((3, 1), int)
    allPixels = list()
    x = 0
    for h in xrange(rgbLength/3):
        for i in xrange(len(pixel)):
            for j in xrange(len(pixel[i])):
                if x < rgbLength: #For some reason, x reaches rgbLength...
                    pixel[i][j] = rgbValues[x]
                    x+=1
        allPixels.append(pixel)
    for pixel in allPixels:
        print pixel, id(pixel)


>>> RGBtoLMS([1,2,3,101,102,103,4,5,6,104,105,106],12)
[[104]
 [105]
 [106]] 38693552
[[104]
 [105]
 [106]] 38693552
[[104]
 [105]
 [106]] 38693552
[[104]
 [105]
 [106]] 38693552

So you can do a few things to get the intended behavior:

>>> def RGBtoLMS(rgbValues, rgbLength): #Passing in a list of rgbValues and an int representing the length of that list
    pixel = numpy.empty((3, 1), int)
    allPixels = list()
    x = 0
    for h in xrange(rgbLength/3):
        for i in xrange(len(pixel)):
            for j in xrange(len(pixel[i])):
                if x < rgbLength: #For some reason, x reaches rgbLength...
                    pixel[i][j] = rgbValues[x]
                    x+=1
        allPixels.append(pixel*1)
    for pixel in allPixels:
        print pixel, id(pixel)


>>> RGBtoLMS([1,2,3,101,102,103,4,5,6,104,105,106],12)
[[1]
 [2]
 [3]] 38301608
[[101]
 [102]
 [103]] 37756712
[[4]
 [5]
 [6]] 37949360
[[104]
 [105]
 [106]] 38399424

Or moving the definition of pixel into the loop.

>>> def RGBtoLMS(rgbValues, rgbLength): #Passing in a list of rgbValues and an int representing the length of that list
    allPixels = list()
    x = 0
    for h in xrange(rgbLength):
        if x < rgbLength: #For some reason, x reaches rgbLength...
            pixel = numpy.empty((3, 1), int)
            for i in xrange(len(pixel)):
                for j in xrange(len(pixel[i])):
                    pixel[i][j] = rgbValues[x]
                    x+=1
            allPixels.append(pixel)
        else:
        break
    for pixel in allPixels:
        print pixel, id(pixel)


>>> RGBtoLMS([1,2,3,101,102,103,4,5,6,104,105,106],12)
[[1]
 [2]
 [3]] 38301608
[[101]
 [102]
 [103]] 37756712
[[4]
 [5]
 [6]] 37949360
[[104]
 [105]
 [106]] 38399424
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