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I have multiple lines in a file like these

APPLE JUICE
APPLE JAM
APPLE JELLY

I want to replace "APPLE" with "ORANGE" and append "SHOP" to the end of the string. The output would be

ORANGE JUICE SHOP
ORANGE JAM SHOP
ORANGE JELLY SHOP

How to do this in sed or vim?

EDIT1: I found a solution that works in sed

#replace APPLE with ORANGE 
sed -i s/APPLE/ORANGE/g foo.txt
#in a line containing ORANGE replace newline with SHOP
sed -i '/ORANGE/s/$/ SHOP/g'

the problem now is that I can't get the second command to work in vim. So this is a vim question now.

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What have you tried? This is pretty basic... You'll need the s command to substitute text. –  twalberg Nov 27 '13 at 20:04

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

here you go:

kent$  echo "APPLE JUICE
APPLE JAM
APPLE JELLY"|sed 's/\bAPPLE\b/ORANGE/;s/$/ SHOP/'
ORANGE JUICE SHOP
ORANGE JAM SHOP
ORANGE JELLY SHOP

I added word boundary, so that something like PINEAPPLE won't be replaced by PINEORANGE

in vim, with the same idea:

%s/\<APPLE\>/ORANGE/|%s/$/ SHOP/

EDIT

when I posted the answer, there is no requirement that, appending SHOP only if there is an ORANGE match. OP updated the question after my answer.

anyway, I added another vim cmd:

%s/\<APPLE\>/ORANGE/g|%s/.*\<ORANGE\>.*/& SHOP/
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1  
Awesome that you answered, but we should encourage users to try something on their own and then come here with problems, rather than have them ask without trying. (I'm sure this is a heavily discussed topic here/meta, just my 2¢) –  Siddhartha Nov 27 '13 at 20:23
    
Thank you! The vim solution is what i needed. Thanks again! –  user2708149 Nov 27 '13 at 20:37
    
@Siddhartha What he suppose to do, add another comment "what have you tried?". –  Arius2038 Nov 28 '13 at 11:09

No, @Kent's answer elide rows not containing APPLE and append SHOP to all lines in file. You need to use RE sub-expressions:

echo "APPLE JUICE\
CHERRY JAM\
APPLE JELLY" | sed 's/^APPLE \(.*\)$/ORANGE \1 SHOP/'
ORANGE JUICE SHOP
CHERRY JAM
ORANGE JELLY SHOP
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when I answered the question, there is no requirement that appending the SHOP only if there was an APPLE. also the new requirement is, appending SHOP for ORANGE. :) –  Kent Nov 28 '13 at 13:51

In vim itself try this one in command mode

:%s/APPLE \ (.*\ )/ORANGE \1 SHOP/g

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If an original line has ORANGE but without APPLE, this command won't add SHOP to that line. #in a line containing ORANGE replace newline with SHOP –  Kent Nov 28 '13 at 13:52

@dyomas is right that @Kent's answer indiscriminately appends SHOP to all lines.

Here is a solution that does not use sub-expressions; instead, it uses the t command that tests for substitutions and only then appends SHOP.

sed 's/\bAPPLE\b/ORANGE/; t append; b; :append s/$/ SHOP/'

Because the t command jumps in case of substitution (but we need the opposite), we have to jump "over" a b command that otherwise aborts the line processing.

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