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I've installed the haskell platform on my mac (OSX lion), and ghci is running great.

Now I've created a haskell-file, stored on my "desk." How can I call it from this directory?

doing this:

Prelude> :load datei.hs
[1 of 1] Compiling Main             ( datei.hs, interpreted )

datei.hs:1:7: parse error on input `\'
Failed, modules loaded: none.

datei.hs:

let fac n = if n == 0 then 1 else n * fac (n-1)

why do i get this?

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there is no ` \ ` in what you linked. There must be more input. And haskell isn't an ML you don't need to let to declare functions. Just fac 0 = if n == 0 then 1 else n * fac (n-1) will work. But most people would write it like this fac n = product [1..n] or fac 0 = 1 fac n = n * fac (n-1) –  DiegoNolan Nov 27 '13 at 21:09
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3 Answers

Use the OSX terminal to reach your desktop and invoke yourfile.hs using ghci:

cd ~/Desktop
ghci yourfile.hs

edit:

As stated in the comments, the error message you're seeing above is warning you that the character \ exists at an unexpected location in the source code.

Since that character does not exist in the line of code you posted, there must be more to datei.hs. We need to see the rest of your source code before we can help.

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i edited my question, could you take a look? gretings! –  user2999787 Nov 27 '13 at 20:37
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If you saved your program with TextEdit, it's very possible that you're seeing a '\' character because you're saving it as an RTF file (TextEdit's default). Hit Ctrl-shift-t to convert it into a plain text file.

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If your already in ghci you can use ':cd /path/to/file' as well.

Here is a good thread discussing let.

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