Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Inside a class I have 2 associative arrays. I am trying to call elements from one array to be used in another (kind of master) array.

I would like to ask whether the following can be done, or can't, or what I'm doing so wrong;

Please note, the arrays are examples.

class ProductData {

    private $texture = [0=>'Cream', 1=>'Powder', 2=>'Liquid', 3=>'Paste', 4=>'Solid'];

    private $food = ['type'=>'Pasta', 'info'=>[1=>'750gm', 2=>'$4.50', 3=>$this->texture[4]],
                     'type'=>'Soup', 'info'=>[1=>'500ml', 2=>'$7.60', 3=>$this->texture[2]]];

    // Constructor, Function(s) to access the $food array...
}

Well I have found out the hard way that this cannot be done. I receive a syntax error;

  • syntax error unexpected '$this' (T_VARIABLE).

If I replace the $this with $texture, I receive the same error;

  • syntax error unexpected '$texture' (T_VARIABLE).

I'm thinking that this cannot be done, or I'm doing something very wrong, or both.

If this can be done, any assistance is very much appreciated.

Thanks, njc

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
class ProductData {

private $texture;
private $food;

function __construct(){

    $this->texture = [0=>'Cream', 1=>'Powder', 2=>'Liquid', 3=>'Paste', 4=>'Solid'];
    $this->food = ['type'=>'Pasta', 'info'=>[1=>'750gm', 2=>'$4.50', 3=>$this->texture[4]],
                 'type'=>'Soup', 'info'=>[1=>'500ml', 2=>'$7.60', 3=>$this->texture[2]]];
     //other construct stuff

}

}

share|improve this answer
    
a most gracious thank you to you. I'd love to vote your answer up, but the system just informed I don't have the reputation points to do so. +1 to you. –  njc Nov 27 '13 at 22:20

You can only use constant values to define property values outside class methods. So in your case, you cannot use the $this variable, as it references the current object instance.

You should move the initialisation to the __construct (which is really what is meant to be for)

Check out the documentation:

This declaration may include an initialization, but this initialization must be a constant value--that is, it must be able to be evaluated at compile time and must not depend on run-time information in order to be evaluated.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you too. +1 –  njc Nov 27 '13 at 22:22

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.