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I'm having a super simple problem, but I also had a question, so I figured I'd post both.

First of all, I'm not sure what's not working about this program cycling through an array and out putting the values. What's happening now, is that it just outputs the last value in the array.

int myArray[10] = {0,1,1,2,3,5,8,13,21,34};

int i = 0;

for( i = 0; i < 9; i++);
{
    cout << i + 1 << '\t' << myArray[i] << endl;
}

that's not working for some reason, but I also wanted to know why, if I initialize the i variable inside the for loop, it says myArray[i] inside of the for loops, at the cout, isn't initialized at all. Peculiar to me.

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closed as off-topic by Sayem Ahmed, Zac Howland, lpapp, Yu Hao, JBL Mar 5 at 10:11

  • This question does not appear to be about programming within the scope defined in the help center.
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
What do you mean by not working? Are you getting any compilation error/different output? –  Sayem Ahmed Nov 28 '13 at 4:54
    
I fixed it in the question, sorry about that. It's just outputting the last value in the array. –  Slimmons Nov 28 '13 at 4:56
3  
This question appears to be off-topic because it is about a typo. –  Sayem Ahmed Nov 28 '13 at 4:59

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I just tested the following code and it worked:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main() {

int myArray[10] = {0,1,1,2,3,5,8,13,21,34};

for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
    cout << i + 1 << '\t' << myArray[i] << endl;
}

}

Notice the syntactical changes that were made. Also you were previously leaving out the last element in the array.


What's important to note is that a semicolon is a null statement. By placing a semicolon after a for loop, you are executing the null statement (i.e. do nothing) for the total number of iterations through the loop. Afterwards, the code inside the curly braces is run as if it were regular code in the body of your method. That's why only the last iteration was printing, because the for loop had "done nothing" for all the other iterations but still incremented i. Therefore, when the code within the braces ran, it did so for the last expected iteration.

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Wow, I didn't even notice that semicolon there. Thanks. I didn't think the code would run with a semicolon there. Is there any reason it does? Is there a use for the code with a semicolon at the end of a for loop? –  Slimmons Nov 28 '13 at 5:00
    
Sure, I'll add the explanation to my answer above. –  Philip Nov 28 '13 at 5:01
for( i = 0; i < 9; i++);
//                     ^here

Remove the extra semicolon. The original code in your question is equivalent to:

for( i = 0; i < 9; i++)
{
    //do nothing
}
{
    cout << i + 1 << '\t' << myArray[i] << endl;
}

Now you can declare i inside the for loop:

for( int i = 0; i < 9; i++)
{
    cout << i + 1 << '\t' << myArray[i] << endl;
}
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You have an extra semicolon here:

 for( i = 0; i < 9; i++);  // there should be no semi-colon at the end of this line.
 //                     ^ remove this!

What's happening is that the compiler iterates the loop completely, running the "empty" loop body (that extra semicolon). After the loop is done, it reaches your cout statement.

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for( i = 0; i < 9; i++);
//                     ^ THIS TINY PIECE OF ABOMINATION
{
    cout << i + 1 << '\t' << myArray[i] << endl;
}

Remove it.

The block below the for statement isn't associated with it because the for is actually associated with a null statement (indicated by the ; immediately after the for()).

You should also put your declaration of i inside for

for(int i = 0; i < 9; i++) {
...

That way, you limit its scope and makes you less prone to some errors.

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