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How would I append a char to string that has no initial value in the following method I've started:

void append(char a) {
    const char *str;

    char *ret = malloc (strlen(str)+2);
    strncpy(str,strlen(str),ret);
    ret[strlen(str)-2] = a;
    ret[strlen(str)-1] = 0;

    printf("%s", str);
}

I've tried a few different answers to other questions but none have worked, please help.

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You can't. str is not valid. – John3136 Nov 28 '13 at 6:06
1  
The logic in this doesn't make sense. str only has the scope of append, so what do you plan on doing with it? – Austin Brunkhorst Nov 28 '13 at 6:07
    
Allocate at least two bytes for str, set str[0] = a; str[1] = 0;. – 0123456789 Nov 28 '13 at 6:08

Since the pointer str is not initialized, you can't add characters to what it points at. What makes sense depends on what you're going to do next. Since you don't return a value from the function, you can't access the string to which a is appended unless append calls some other function.

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char *str; is not a string. It is a mnemonic that says that *str will give you a value which is supposedly a character.

str is a pointer that points at random. Make it point to an allocated bunch of memory first. Do something like- str = malloc(100); and then do a *(str+1) = a and then a *(str+2) = '\0' to NULL terminate the string.

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how about something like:

char * append(char a, const char * str)
{
    char *ret = malloc (strlen(str)+2);
    strncpy(str,strlen(str),ret);
    ret[strlen(str)-2] = a;
    ret[strlen(str)-1] = 0;
    return ret;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I've done it differently and updated my original post. Why is mine giving me errors? – user3044566 Nov 28 '13 at 6:35

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