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I have filenames in a particular format in a linux folder. I want to extract string between the first and second underscore of those filenames and count such types of files in that folder. The filenames are like the following :

2305237803310_ABC_A05_1378414278883.hl7

20132480014907_DEF_R01_1378420192336.hl7

20132480014793_DEF_R01_1378418604889.hl7

2313642803310_ABC_A08_1378824296915.hl7

2313614403310_ABC_A08_1378823995805.hl7

2313614403310_MNY_A08_1378823995805.hl7

and so on

The output of my script should give me :

ABC 3

DEF 2

MNY 1
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closed as off-topic by Toto, tiago, André Dion, Lyuben Todorov, Frédéric Hamidi Nov 28 '13 at 13:24

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3  
What have you tried so far? Do you have a specific question? –  Peter DeGlopper Nov 28 '13 at 6:40
1  
cut -d_ -f2 filename –  devnull Nov 28 '13 at 6:42
1  
We will help if you ask a question concerning the problems with your code, we're not going to do all the work for you :) –  aIKid Nov 28 '13 at 6:47
1  
Well.. at least not me, some others has finished it though X) –  aIKid Nov 28 '13 at 6:54
    
Will code for internet points : D. But seriously it can help beginners a lot to see a few solutions in action. I also always love seeing the different ways people approach questions here. –  Tim Wilder Nov 28 '13 at 6:59

4 Answers 4

Use defaultdict or Counter or setdefault or __missing__ idiom to count them up. Here is __missing__:

txt='''\
2305237803310_ABC_A05_1378414278883.hl7
20132480014907_DEF_R01_1378420192336.hl7
20132480014793_DEF_R01_1378418604889.hl7
2313642803310_ABC_A08_1378824296915.hl7
2313614403310_ABC_A08_1378823995805.hl7
2313614403310_MNY_A08_1378823995805.hl7'''

class Dicto(dict):
    def __missing__(self, key):
        self[key]=0
        return self[key]

d=Dicto()      
for line in txt.splitlines():
    k=line.split('_')       
    d[k[1]]+=1

print d  
# {'MNY': 1, 'ABC': 3, 'DEF': 2}
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Using dict and split it can be easy:

s = ["2305237803310_ABC_A05_1378414278883.hl7","20132480014907_DEF_R01_1378420192336.hl7","20132480014793_DEF_R01_1378418604889.hl7",
     "2313642803310_ABC_A08_1378824296915.hl7","2313614403310_ABC_A08_1378823995805.hl7","2313614403310_MNY_A08_1378823995805.hl7"]

resultsDict = {}    
for value in s:

    m = value.split("_")

    if len(m) > 2:    
       myString = m[1]    
       if myString in resultsDict:
           resultsDict[myString] += 1
       else:
           resultsDict.update({myString: 1})    
    else:
        print "error in the string! there are less then 2 _"

print resultsDict

Output:

{'MNY': 1, 'ABC': 3, 'DEF': 2}
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I would use a regex, os.listdir, and a dict to keep track of the count. Something like this is relatively compact and the approach can generalize to other similar problems.

import re
import os
import collections


def print_names():
    names_count = collections.Counter()
    regex = r'[^_]+_([^_]*)_.*'
    for file_name in os.listdir("."):
        match = re.match(regex, file_name)
        if match:
            names_count[match.groups()[0]] += 1

    for name, count in names_count.items():
        print(name, count)


if __name__ == "__main__":
    print_names()

Output with the example files: ABC 3 MNY 1 DEF 2

share|improve this answer
    
As I am using python 2.6.6 I changed the code slightly and it worked well import re import os resultsDict = {} regex = r'[^_]+_([^_]*)_.*' for file_name in os.listdir("."): m = file_name.split("_") if len(m) > 2: myString = m[1] if myString in resultsDict: resultsDict[myString] += 1 else: resultsDict.update({myString: 1}) else: print "error in the string! there are less then 2 _" print resultsDict –  user1679829 Dec 3 '13 at 4:39

bash (100% internal commands):

#!/bin/bash

declare -A ARRAY

cd "/your/linux/folder"
for TAG in *
do TAG=${TAG#*_}; TAG=${TAG%%_*}; (( ++ARRAY[$TAG] ))
done

for TAG in ${!ARRAY[*]}
do echo $TAG ${ARRAY[$TAG]}
done

output:

ABC 3
MNY 1
DEF 2
share|improve this answer
    
...and if you want the output sorted...pipe it to sort ;-) –  thom Nov 28 '13 at 11:28

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