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I know that it's typically a big no-no to remove from a list using java's "foreach" and that one should use iterator.remove(). But is it safe to remove() if I'm looping over a HashMap's keySet()? Like this:

for(String key : map.keySet()) {
  Node n = map.get(key).optimize();
  if(n == null) {
   map.remove(key);
  } else {
   map.put(key, n);
  }
}
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Have you tried it? Did you see a ConcurrentModificationException? yes, then it isn't going to work. If you use ConcurrentHashMap, this will work. However, since you are replacing every element in the map why don't you build a new HashMap and replace the original? –  Peter Lawrey Jan 9 '10 at 13:28
2  
Well I was looking for expertise regarding the subject and I've often run into problems in the past when code that ran didn't really work right because I didn't understand it. Regarding building a new map, it seems to me that it would less efficient to create a lot of new objects(Map.Entry's) than the solution below which allows the modification of the existing object. –  Sam Washburn Jan 14 '10 at 6:03
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2 Answers

up vote 15 down vote accepted

EDIT:

I hadn't noticed that you weren't really adding to the map - you were just changing the value within the entry. In this case, pstanton's (pre-edit1) solution is nearly right, but you should call setValue on the entry returned by the iterator, rather than calling map.put. (It's possible that map.put will work, but I don't believe it's guaranteed - whereas the docs state that entry.setValue will work.)

for (Iterator<Map.Entry<String, Node>> it = map.entrySet().iterator(); 
     it.hasNext();)
{
    Map.Entry<String, Node> entry = it.next();
    Node n = entry.getValue().optimize();
    if(n == null) 
    {
        it.remove();
    }
    else
    {
        entry.setValue(n);
    }
}

(It's a shame that entry doesn't have a remove method, otherwise you could still use the enhanced for loop syntax, making it somewhat less clunky.)

Old answer

(I've left this here for the more general case where you just want to make arbitrary modifications.)

No - you should neither add to the map nor remove from it directly. The set returned by HashSet.keySet() is a view onto the keys, not a snapshot.

You can remove via the iterator, although that requires that you use the iterator explicitly instead of via an enhanced for loop.

One simple option is to create a new set from the original:

for (String key : new HashSet<String>(map.keySet())) {
    ...
}

At this point you're fine, because you're not making any changes to the set.

EDIT: Yes, you can definitely remove elements via the key set iterator. From the docs for HashMap.keySet():

The set supports element removal, which removes the corresponding mapping from the map, via the Iterator.remove, Set.remove, removeAll, retainAll, and clear operations. It does not support the add or addAll operations.

This is even specified within the Map interface itself.


1 I decided to edit my answer rather than just commenting on psanton's, as I figured the extra information I'd got for similar-but-distinct situations was sufficiently useful to merit this answer staying.

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1  
If I remove from the keySet using it's iterator, does it also remove it from the map? –  Sam Washburn Jan 8 '10 at 7:37
    
I went ahead and gave you the accepted answer since even if map.put works, I'm sure entry.setValue is more efficient. Thanks for looking it up! –  Sam Washburn Jan 8 '10 at 7:55
1  
"It's a shame that entry doesn't have a remove method" - that would require an extra field on the Entry object pointing back to the Map object. –  Stephen C Jan 8 '10 at 8:08
    
@Stephen: That's very true. It's a bit like the fact that String memoizes its hash code - useful in some situations, annoying everywhere else :( –  Jon Skeet Jan 8 '10 at 8:15
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you should use the entry set:

for(Iterator<Map.Entry<String, Node>> it = map.entrySet().iterator(); it.hasNext();)
{
      Map.Entry<String, Node> entry = it.next();
      Node n = entry.getValue().optimize();
      if(n == null) 
          it.remove();
      else
          entry.setValue(n);
}

EDIT fixed code

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