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I've read a bunch about auto implemented properties but I still don't quite get it. I have and entity:

 public class News
    {
        public int NewsId { get; set; }
        public string Title { get; set; }
        public string Content { get; set; }
        public DateTime Date { get; set; }
    }

Now I don't want the user to set date himself every time a new entity of News type is created. I want the record to be saved automatically with the datetime it's created. Thinking about it I suggest that it's enough to just modify the set for my property to something like :

public DateTime Date 
{
  get;
  set
  {
    Date = DateTime.Now;
  }
}

But reading about the topic I saw that the standard way is to create private variable and use it instead in the implementation. That's where I get a little bit lost.

private DateTime _date = null;
public DateTime Date
{ 

Well I'm not sure for the getter and setter implementations. It seems reasonable to have something like : set { _date = DateTime.Now;} and I have no idea how to deal with the get part since I want this data to be fetched from the database so something like : get {return _date;} doesn't make much sense to me even though almost every example with auto implementedset` returns the private variable. But I think that if the property is an entity this is not making a lot of sense.

share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Some ways to return the current date:

 public DateTime Date { get { return DateTime.Now; } }

or

 public class News
 {
    public News()
    {
       Date = DateTime.Now;
    }
    public DateTime Date { get; private set; }
 }

The first one will always return the current date/time, even if that instance was created some time ago. The second one will return the date/time the instance was created. Both prevent the user from setting that Date value.

share|improve this answer
    
Since it's property of an entity, I will need to be able to show the time of creation (as you can see from the name, it's a News table). So when I get the date I need the database date, but when I set the date, that means I create new entity/news I want to set the date of the entity creation. So I guess second approach? – Leron Nov 28 '13 at 8:53
    
@Leron - if some code can set the date (retrieval from database) and other code not ("client" side code), that's a problem. You might be able to use an other constructor to set the date, but then you have to write the database-to-entity code yourself. – Hans Kesting Nov 28 '13 at 8:58
    
I see what you mean. If I understood you right when I query for a record the date will be always override with the DateTime.Now. So it's easier just to set the date in the code where the others properties are set instead of looking for a way to move the logic to the entity? – Leron Nov 28 '13 at 9:14
    
@Leron - correct. You could still in the constructor provide a default value (DateTime.Now), for the new newsitems. – Hans Kesting Nov 28 '13 at 9:24

You could add a constructor to your class and then initialize there your property.

public class News
{

   // properties goes here

   public News()
   {
       Date=DateTime.Now;
   }

}

A far better constructor would be the following

public News(int newsId, string title, string content)
{
    NewsId=newsId;
    Title=title;
    Content=content;
    Date=DateTime.Now;
}

That way you could create an object of type News in a single line of code.

News news = new News(1,"title1","whatever");
share|improve this answer
    
Hi. What is this value variable I've searched but I couldn't find explanation on how exactly its created and used. Seems like something I can use right away when implement a custom getter/setter but I really don't get the difference between Date = DateTime.Now and value = DateTime.Now; – Leron Nov 28 '13 at 8:48
    
@Leron The contextual keyword value is used in the set accessor in ordinary property declarations. I used false before. Please look here msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/vstudio/a1khb4f8.aspx – Christos Nov 28 '13 at 8:51
    
But you've changed it by moving the logic in the constructor. Is that better, or because I've asked how to do it using my Date property? – Leron Nov 28 '13 at 8:54
    
@Leron, I think that the are two ways to do this. The first is the above the second is that Hans suggested. It's a matter of your personal opinion rather that better implementation in this case. – Christos Nov 28 '13 at 8:59
    
the NewsId is auto generated property in the database. The problem is how to set the property automatically when entity is saved but when I query to get the date from the table. – Leron Nov 28 '13 at 9:08

Don't touch the getter and setter! They are auto generated from a template and will be overridden every once and a while. Instead, as you might have noticed the generated entities are declared partially, create a partial class and declare a constructor there that sets the _date or Date of you r entity to DateTime.Now on construction (just as you desired).

public partial class News
{
  public News()
  {
    this.Date = DateTime.Now;
  }
} 
share|improve this answer
    
Well, I'm not exactly sure I understand you. I haven't written this but it's Code First workflow so all the entities are written by me. I've seen partial classes for entities but used with Database First workflow where the entities are auto generated. What's the point to have my own News entity and then add partial class just to add a constructor? – Leron Nov 28 '13 at 9:00
    
Ah I get it! But then you could easily set the date to DateTime.Now in your constructor as others mentioned as well. – YoupTube Nov 28 '13 at 9:05

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