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I am testing exception handling in my .NET application. With code below, I can log all exceptions, but I don't know how to catch them, so they are not stopping my application. Here's the code I am using:

public class ExceptionHandler

{
    public ExceptionHandler()
    {
        AppDomain currentDomain = AppDomain.CurrentDomain;
        currentDomain.FirstChanceException += MyHandler2;

    }

    private void MyHandler2(object sender, FirstChanceExceptionEventArgs e)
    {
        try
        {
            throw e.Exception;
            //this ends up in eternal loop with 'stack overflow'
        }
        catch (Exception exception)
        {
           //exception never comes here, but if the exception is
          //not caught inside catch block, then it's unhandled and it stops application
        }
    }

}

So, how can I catch the exception e in MyHandler2 ? I can't use only catch, it must be try - catch ...

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2  
VB.NET tag is not relevant, is it? –  Tim Schmelter Nov 28 '13 at 9:24
2  
You just want to have your logging logic in there. Everything else will continue as normal when the handler exits, and the exception will just run its normal course (as it would have without your handler). –  Baldrick Nov 28 '13 at 9:28
    
@Tim - why not? I can do the same thing in VB.NET. Baldrick - I want to catch the exception. So this is not possible? –  FrenkyB Nov 28 '13 at 9:31
2  
The problem with an unhandled exception is where to resume execution. Think about it - an exception unwinds the stack until it hits a catch block or goes all the way back to the top. If you haven't handled it in place then where, exactly, do you want your program to resume? Which line of code should it execute next? That's why you need to handle exceptions. There's no getting around it. –  J... Nov 28 '13 at 9:38
1  
You can't kill an unhandled exception. Only catch it so that you can either log it for debugging purposes or so that you can maybe tidy up some open resources before the application/service bombs out. If you are getting unhandled exceptions; you are taking shortcuts somewhere in your app and greater effor should be taken to stop/handle the source of these exceptions. –  daveL Nov 28 '13 at 10:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Well, of course it is not getting to the catch clause. Unintentionally, you have created a recursion:

  1. First chance exception occurred somewhere in your program.
  2. You handler is being triggered.
  3. There is a first chance exception in your handler, woops! better go to my exception handler!
  4. You handler is being triggered.
  5. There is a first chance exception in your handler, woops! better go to my exception handler!
  6. You handler is being triggered.
  7. There is a first chance exception in your handler, woops! better go to my exception handler!
  8. You handler is being triggered.
  9. There is a first chance exception in your handler, woops! better go to my exception handler!
    ...

and there is your stack overflow...

As @Marc Gravell pointed out in his answer, this event is not for handling exceptions. Exceptions should be handled locally.
Take a look at this SO thread for more details.

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Now I understand how it happens. –  FrenkyB Nov 28 '13 at 9:34

You can't suppress exceptions in the way you are trying; this is just an opportunity to do things like logging; from MSDN:

This event is only a notification. Handling this event does not handle the exception or affect subsequent exception handling in any way.

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Why do you want to throw exception again? just work on e.Exception in MyHandler2. FirstChanceException Handler will take it before CLR and thus it will never reach to Catch block in MyHandler2 and will again call MyHandler2 and thus it will become recursive and end up in StackOverflow.

As explained by Mark:

This event is only a notification. Handling this event does not handle the exception or affect subsequent exception handling in any way.

Following is the only way to catch(get notified) it:

private void MyHandler2(object sender, FirstChanceExceptionEventArgs e)
{
   //Never throw here
   //throw e.Exception;

   GetNotified(e.Exception);
}

Here GetNotified is a method where you can log error or send notifications (everything except throwing error).

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Can you please provide namespace for Handle? I can not find it. –  FrenkyB Nov 28 '13 at 9:59
    
What do you mean by Handle? –  Imran Rizvi Nov 28 '13 at 12:27
    
At first your code was: Handle(e.Exception) -> after edit it is GetNotified(e.Exception). Now I understand (or at least I guess so), that with 'Handle' you've just meant logging or some other operation and not catching the exception. –  FrenkyB Nov 28 '13 at 16:27
    
@user867703 Yes , I changed the method name so that it should be clear that this method does not throw exception any further and just write log or get notified. –  Imran Rizvi Nov 29 '13 at 5:34

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