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How do I determine if an object reference is null in C# w/o throwing an exception if it is null?

i.e. If I have a class reference being passed in and I don't know if it is null or not.

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9 Answers 9

up vote 13 down vote accepted

testing against null will never* throw an exception

void DoSomething( MyClass value )
{
    if( value != null )
    {
        value.Method();
    }
}

* never as in should never. As @Ilya Ryzhenkov points out, an incorrect implementation of the != operator for MyClass could throw an exception. Fortunately Greg Beech has a good blog post on implementing object equality in .NET.

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There's at least one way it'll throw: theObj.Equals( null) –  Michael Burr Oct 14 '08 at 20:26
    
or if ( value == null) Thanks! –  Fred Oct 14 '08 at 20:27
    
And this works only with reference type –  milot Oct 14 '08 at 20:28
    
@Mike B. Technically that's not testing against null, but invoking the method Equals() on theObj, which, as you say, will throw an exception if theObj reference is null. –  Robert Paulson Oct 14 '08 at 20:32

Note, that having operator != defined on MyClass would probably lead do different result of a check and NullReferenceException later on. To be absolutely sure, use object.ReferenceEquals(value, null)

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if(p != null)
{
   DoWork(p);
}

Also, the 'as' keyword is helpful if you want to detect if a class is of the right type and use it all at once.

IExample e = p as IExample;
if(e != null)
    DoWork(e);

In the above example if you were to cast e like (IExample)e it will throw an exception if e does not implement IExapmle. If you use 'as' and e doesn't implement IExample e will simply be null.

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It's nit picky, but I always code these like ...

if (null == obj) {
   obj = new Obj();
}

instead of

if (obj == null) {
   obj = new Obj();
}

to avoid accidently writing

if (obj = null) {
   obj = new Obj();
}

because

if (null = obj) {
   obj = new Obj();
}

will give you a compiler error

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if (obj = null) gives you the "possible misuse of =" compiler warning –  Jimmy Oct 14 '08 at 21:33
    
In C# your condition expression must be a boolean, which obj = null never will be (obj = true, on the other hand is). Yoda code is not recommended in C#. –  justin.m.chase Jun 24 '13 at 19:44

If you look in the majority of the .NET framework source code you will see they put checks like this at the top of their functions.

public void DoSomething(Object myParam)
{
  if (myParam == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("myParam");

  // Carry on
}
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Good advice for a public interface where a null reference is invalid in the context of the called method. –  Robert Paulson Oct 14 '08 at 21:02

What Robert said, but for that particular case I like to express it like this, rather than nest the whole method body in an if block:

void DoSomething( MyClass value )
{
    if ( value == null )
    {
        // I might throw an exception here, too
        return;
    }

    value.Method();
}
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I think you mean 'value == null'. Calling value.Method() on a null object would be bad. –  justin.m.chase Oct 14 '08 at 20:26
    
Yeah, that's what I get for copy/pasting. Fixed now. –  Joel Coehoorn Oct 14 '08 at 20:32
    
> I might throw an exception here, too: if so, probably throw new ArgumentNullException("value"); –  Joe Oct 14 '08 at 20:36

Or if you are using value types you can read about nullable types: http://www.c-sharpcorner.com/UploadFile/mosessaur/nullabletypes08222006164135PM/nullabletypes.aspx

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(YourObject != Null)

you can compare to null?

If it's null instead of throwing an exception you can initialize your object. You can use the Null Pattern.

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fyi - YouTube video of a code example for the Null Pattern youtube.com/watch?v=hp1Y9bhail8 –  Robert Paulson Oct 14 '08 at 20:35

I have in the application's xaml.cs application derivative definition:

private SortedList myList;

And I want to be able to re-use my constructors. So I needed:

if ( myList == null)
   myList = new SortedList();

Thanks Robert!

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