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I have a c++ library and I plan to add a optional feature to it (enabled by a macro) to show some extra debugging information. The idea is to create and open a window made with Qt to display some data. My problem is that I don't have access to the main function (it is a library) so I can't create the QApplication object Qt needs. I have tried creating global objects like this:

static int argc = 1;
static char argv[1][6] = {"myapp"};
static QApplication app(argc, (char**)argv);

It works but crashes at exit (on ~QApplication()).

Another option would be allocate the object on heap and have new API methods to initialize/finalize the library. But I don't want to change the API at all.

Yet another would be allocate on heap on the first time I need to open a window and just leak it. But doesn't seems like a good idea.

Any ideas?

I'm using Qt 5.1 with GCC 4.8 targeting Windows and Linux.

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QApplication::instance() will give you access to the one defined in main (if there is one) as a QCoreApplication –  ratchet freak Nov 28 '13 at 13:28
    
The point is that I don't want to force the users of the library to add something their main (or even include Qt at all). –  Guilherme Bernal Nov 28 '13 at 13:33
    
you are going to need a thread for the event loop that will need to be stopped when the application stops –  ratchet freak Nov 28 '13 at 13:46
1  
"instantialize" –  Lightness Races in Orbit Nov 28 '13 at 14:48

1 Answer 1

Another option would be allocate the object on heap and have new API methods to initialize/finalize the library. But I don't want to change the API at all. - well don't leak it, have a global heap allocated object and create it when somebody attaches to the library and destroy when the attache detaches. And yeah, the point about the thread is also 100% correct, since attaching/detaching just comes in from the calling thread and you can't block that, you most likely want to spawn of a new thread, allocate the QApplication there, maybe even in the threads local stack, and call run() there.

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