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I have 2 Python lists with integers (average and avg). Average is sorted revers. Alphabet is just a list with the alphabet a-z and the last element is the empty string representing the space. Average is the letter frequency of a text file. I'm trying to get a substitution cipher to work for my study.

average = [1, 17, 11, 2, 0, 4, 0, 5, 2, 6, 0, 4, 1, 1, 3, 1, 3, 2, 1, 0, 6, 5, 0, 1, 0, 7, 5]
alphabet = ['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f', 'g', 'h', 'i', 'j', 'k', 'l', 'm', 'n', 'o', 'p', 'q', 'r', 's', 't', 'u', 'v', 'w', 'x', 'y', 'z', ' ']

avg = average[:]
average.sort(reverse = True)

for x in range(27):
  for y in range(27):
    if average[x] == avg[y]:
      if y < 26:
        alphabet[x] = chr(97 + y) # ASCII a = 97 
      else:
        alphabet[x] = chr(32) # 32 = space

print(alphabet)

For some reason I got this as output:

['b', 'c', 'z', 'u', 'u', ' ', ' ', ' ', 'l', 'l', 'q', 'q', 'r', 'r', 'r', 'x', 'x', 'x', 'x', 'x', 'x', 'y', 'y', 'y', 'y', 'y', 'y']

Which should normally be a list from a to z (containing whitespace) but I can't find the error... Does anyone have a hint?

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Can you show us what avg and average lists look like? –  rdodev Nov 28 '13 at 15:57
4  
What did you actually expect the list to become, and how with that code? –  poke Nov 28 '13 at 15:59
    
avg is [1, 17, 11, 2, 0, 4, 0, 5, 2, 6, 0, 4, 1, 1, 3, 1, 3, 2, 1, 0, 6, 5, 0, 1, 0, 7, 5] and average ist [17, 11, 7, 6, 6, 5, 5, 5, 4, 4, 3, 3, 2, 2, 2, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0] and I expect that I get a ['a','b','c',..... 'y','z',' '] I'm studying media computer science and the loop worked some time and on some point it gave the crazy list. –  JohnA Nov 28 '13 at 16:07
    
Hi @JohnA! Welcome to StackOverflow. I have changed your post to show the values for avg and average and alphabet that you said you had, but the resulting code doesn't show what you say it shows. You can edit and update your own post, and you should do so to show us the values you're actually using. –  Gustav Bertram Nov 28 '13 at 16:22
1  
@JohnA What's missing from your question is why. As evidenced by at least one answer, there are trivial ways to get the alphabet as a list of characters. It's difficult to tell from this question why it's important to go through these hoops to append an empty space to the end of the alphabet. –  kojiro Nov 28 '13 at 16:28

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

In order to get a-z as a result, avg needs to be the same as average after reversing and sorting, and all their values need to be unique.

For position 0 in the alphabet list to be equal to 'a', you need the x,y pair (0,0).

That means that average[x] == avg[y] must be true for the following x,y pairs:

(0, 0)
(1, 1)
(2, 2)
(3, 3)
(4, 4)
(5, 5)
(6, 6)
(7, 7)
(8, 8)
(9, 9)
(10, 10)
(11, 11)
(12, 12)
(13, 13)
(14, 14)
(15, 15)
(16, 16)
(17, 17)
(18, 18)
(19, 19)
(20, 20)
(21, 21)
(22, 22)
(23, 23)
(24, 24)
(25, 25)
(26, 26)

Given your code, one value of average for which you can expect to get a-z is:

average = [27, 26, 25, 24, 23, 22, 21, 20, 19, 18, 17, 16, 15, 14, 13, 12, 11, 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1]

In conclusion

As for what magic originally made that loop produce a-z, I suspect that the line that now reads as follows:

if average[x] == avg[y]:

May have originally read as this instead:

if x == y:

In which case you could throw absolutely any input at it, and it will merrily produce the required a-z.

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Thank you very much Gustav! This fixed it, thanks! –  JohnA Dec 2 '13 at 20:37

I honestly don’t get why you expect to get the full alphabet back from that code. Let’s see what happens just for a single value of x.

So x is 0, meaning we’re going to fill the first spot. average is avg in reverse sorted order; and avg is a seemingly unrelated list of numbers. So this is what happens for x = 0:

for y in range(27):
    if average[x] == avg[y]:
        if y < 26:
            alphabet[x] = chr(97 + y) # ASCII a = 97 
        else:
            alphabet[x] = chr(32) # 32 = space

average[x] is the biggest number, 17. Now there is only a single spot where 17 occurs in avg, namely at index y=1. So the inner part of the loop only executes once for x=0 and y=1:

if y < 26:
    alphabet[x] = chr(97 + y) # ASCII a = 97 
else:
    alphabet[x] = chr(32) # 32 = space

Now y=1 is obviously smaller than 26 so the first case applies, in which case the character for the alphabet at index x=0 will be chr(97 + 1). This is not the a you apparently expected in the output.

For other x, these things happen similarly, except that it gets even more complicated when values for average[x] come up that are not unique. In that case, the alphabet character is overwritten multiple times.

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@TimPeters Right, thanks ;) –  poke Nov 28 '13 at 16:48

Well, I have no idea what you're trying to accomplish with this code, but it's easy enough to figure out why you're getting the result you do get. Just step through the code! After the sort, you have this:

average = [17, 11, 7, 6, 6, 5, 5, 5, 4, 4, 3, 3,
           2, 2, 2, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]
avg =     [1, 17, 11, 2, 0, 4, 0, 5, 2, 6, 0, 4,
           1, 1, 3, 1, 3, 2, 1, 0, 6, 5, 0, 1, 0, 7, 5]

Now your loop starts looking at average[0], which is 17. The only index such that avg[y] == 17 is y=1. So your code does:

 alphabet[x] = chr(97 + y) # ASCII a = 97

which is:

 alphabet[0] = chr(97 + 1)

which is:

 alphabet[0] = chr(98)

which is:

 alphabet[0] = 'b'

You're done with the first iteration of the outer loop then, so alphabet[0] == 'b' is the final value assigned to alphabet[0].

Etc etc etc. There's nothing surprising here I can see - the code is doing what you told it to do.

share|improve this answer

If you want to easily get a list from a to z, Python already gives you one:

>>> from string import ascii_lowercase
>>> alphabet = ascii_lowercase + ' '
>>> alphabet
'abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz '
share|improve this answer
    
I have already a normal list with the alphabet. –  JohnA Nov 28 '13 at 16:12

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