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I am unsuccessful in turning this function into a vectorised one:

a=np.asarray([[1,2,3],[3,4,5]])
inds=np.asarray([0,2])
vals=np.asarray([10,12])
def new_insert(arr,inds,vals):
    ret=np.zeros((arr.shape[0],arr.shape[1]+1))
    for i in range(arr.shape[0]):
        ret[i]=np.insert(arr[i],inds[i],vals[i])
    return ret
print new_insert(a,inds,vals)

With output:

[[ 10.   1.   2.   3.]
 [  3.   4.  12.   5.]]

Any helps?

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can switch to a 1d view of your array a:

shape = a.shape
a.shape = np.multiply(*shape)

recalculate indexes for 1-d array:

ind1d = [i+e*shape[0] for i, e in enumerate(ind)]

insert in 1d array

b = np.insert(a, ind1d, vals)

and reshape result back to 2d

b.shape = (shape[0], shape[1]+1)

So, finally, we get

>>> b
array([[10,  1,  2,  3],
       [ 3,  4, 12,  5]])

An onliner, proposed by @askewchan in comments, using np.ravel_multi_index helper function to flatten index:

>>> np.insert(a.flat, np.ravel_multi_index((np.arange(ind.size), ind), 
...               a.shape), vals).reshape(a.shape[0], -1)
array([[10,  1,  2,  3],
       [ 3,  4, 12,  5]])
share|improve this answer
4  
In one line, b = np.insert(a.flat, np.ravel_multi_index((np.arange(ind.size), ind), a.shape), vals).reshape(a.shape[0], -1) – askewchan Nov 28 '13 at 18:53
    
I just started using this and figured out that it doesnt work when you want to insert to the rightmost position of the array because insert does not cover that case. What can I do? – Cupitor Jan 25 '14 at 19:20

Figured I'd post my comment to @alko's answer as an answer, since it looks a bit confusing as one line:

b = np.insert(a.flat, np.ravel_multi_index((np.arange(ind.size), ind), a.shape), vals).reshape(a.shape[0], -1)

This is basically the same as @alko's but it has a few advantages:

  • It does not modify a itself, by using the a.flat iterator instead of actually changing the shape of a.
  • Avoids potential bugs by using the np.ravel_multi_index to create the ind1d array instead of doing it manually.
  • It is a tiny bit (10%) faster.

In steps similar to alko's, this is what it does:

ind1d = np.ravel_multi_index((np.arange(ind.size), ind), a.shape)

where ind refers to column index, so use np.arange to refer to row index. Then, insert into the a.flat iterator instead of the reshaped a:

b = np.insert(a.flat, ind1d, vals)

Finally, reshape:

b = b.reshape(a.shape[0], -1) # the -1 allows any shape at the end
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot for comments and explaining as well. – Cupitor Nov 28 '13 at 21:26
    
Hey this method doesn't cover the case where the index points to the last element, i.e. when we have to insert to the rightmost of the array. Do you have any idea what I can do? – Cupitor Jan 25 '14 at 19:10

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